Charlotte Environment Committee Meeting – March 16, 12:00

What will our Water System Master Plan look like moving forward? What goals and strategies are needed for 2016 to preserve and protect our Charlotte environment?  Why not attend the CharlotteEnvironment Committee meeting on Monday, March 16 at 12:00 p.m. in Room 280 and find out so that you can speak out?

Char Enviro Comm Mar 16 2015

Char Enviro Cpmm 2015 Strat Plan

Be there! Crucial Oct 27th Charlotte City Council Vote on Stormwater Controls

The agenda was published yesterday and the vote for THE Most Important Environmental Decision of the year is scheduled for  6:30 PM, October 27th at the Government Center, 600 E. Fourth Street, Charlotte NC (free evening parking in Fourth Street parking deck). Check out the agenda items below.

Plan to attend the meeting and bring a sign calling for VOTE NO on this weakening of our clean water protections.

If you really want to learn more about the details, you can read this article in Creative Loafing: http://clclt.com/charlotte/developers-vs-the-environment/Content?oid=3534215

But here’s what you need to do immediately:

Send a letter, email or call the Mayor and as many City Council members as you can and tell them to oppose the extension of the temporary policy that allows developers to pay a fee to avoid on-site pollution controls. This fee is called a “fee-in-lieu,” meaning the developer makes a payment “in-lieu” of doing what is needed to control on-site pollution. While the payment will theoretically be used by the City storm water department to help clean-up our streams, that’s a backwards way of approaching the problem and will harm our streams. On-site pollution controls are needed.

Here are some talking points that you can use:

  • Please oppose the extension of the “fee-in-lieu” to the Post-Construction Controls Ordinance.
  • Over 80% of our streams are impaired and not fit for human contact.
  • This is Charlotte’s most important ordinance for water quality.
  • PCCO provides on-site regulations that are needed and cannot be replaced by less effective mitigation. On-site controls offer the best method of controlling pollution.
  • PCCO was a compromise. A group of stakeholders met over several years to develop the ordinance. We can’t compromise on the compromise.
  • It’s unrealistic to believe that development is being stopped by the PCCO.
  • We should actually strengthen PCCO by requiring on-site filters.
  • This is an example of paid staff from the development community trying to wear down citizens who have limited time to stay informed and involved in complicated issues. Citizens lose faith in the government and the process when this occurs.
  • We should rename PCCO to “Charlotte Stream Protection Law” so that citizens can recognize its importance.
  • This is an opportunity for the City Council to show environmental leadership and accountability.

Scroll down to see the email and phone numbers for the Mayor and City Council members.

 

PCCO Agenda Oct 27 2014 A

PCCO Agenda Oct 27 2014 B

PCCO Agenda Oct 27 2014 C

PCCO Agenda Oct 27 2014 D

Here’s the contact information for the Mayor and City Council:

Mayor   Daniel (Dan) Clodfelter   E-mail:  mayor@charlottenc.gov   Phone:  704-336-2241

Mayor Pro Tem

Michael Barnes   Email: barnesforcharlotte@gmail.com Phone: 704-509-6141

Council At-Large:

David Howard   Email: info@davidhowardclt.com Phone: 704-336-4099

Claire Green Fallon   Email: cfallon@charlottenc.gov Phone: 704-336-6105

Vi Lyles   Email: vlyles@charlottenc.gov Phone: 704-336-3431

District Representatives:

Patsy Kinsey, District 1   Email: pkinsey@charlottenc.gov Phone: 704-336-3432 or 704-376-5367

Al Austin, District 2   Email: aaustin@charlottenc.gov Phone: 704-336-3185

LaWana Mayfield, District 3   Email:     lmayfield@charlottenc.gov Phone:   704-336-3435 (office) or 704-352-7305 (cell)

Greg Phipps, District 4   Email: gaphipps@charlottenc.gov Phone: 704-336-3436

John Autry, District 5   Email: jautry@charlottenc.gov Phone: 704-336-2777

Kenny Smith, District 6   Email: krsmith@charlottenc.gov Phone: 704-336-3433

Ed Driggs, District 7   Email:ed@eddriggs.com Phone: 704-432-7077

 

This is critically important. If we lose this battle, we’ll lose the opportunity to clean-up our polluted streams.

Crucial Charlotte City Council vote on stormwater controls – Oct 27

303d map 2012

To Sierra Club members and the Charlotte Environmental Community:

Are you satisfied that over 80% of the streams in Charlotte are unfit for human contact?

We certainly hope not. And we need you to take a few minutes to do something about it. On Monday night, 10/27/14, the Charlotte City Council will vote on a measure that stands to weaken the ordinance that protects our streams. It’s called the “Post-Construction Controls Ordinance” (PCCO), but it really should be called the “Charlotte Stream Protection Law.” It requires that builders use on-site controls to reduce the storm water runoff that pollutes our streams. The development community wants weaken this law by extending to developers a “get out of jail free card” called the fee-in-lieu.

If you really want to learn more about the details, you can read this article in Creative Loafing:

http://clclt.com/charlotte/developers-vs-the-environment/Content?oid=3534215

But here’s what you need to do immediately:

Send a letter, email or call the Mayor and as many City Council members as you can and tell them to oppose the extension of the temporary policy that allows developers to pay a fee to avoid on-site pollution controls. This fee is called a “fee-in-lieu,” meaning the developer makes a payment “in-lieu” of doing what is needed to control on-site pollution. While the payment will theoretically be used by the City storm water department to help clean-up our streams, that’s a backwards way of approaching the problem and will harm our streams. On-site pollution controls are needed.

Here are some talking points that you can use:

  • Please oppose the extension of the “fee-in-lieu” to the Post-Construction Controls Ordinance.
  • Over 80% of our streams are impaired and not fit for human contact.
  • This is Charlotte’s most important ordinance for water quality.
  • PCCO provides on-site regulations that are needed and cannot be replaced by less effective mitigation. On-site controls offer the best method of controlling pollution.
  • PCCO was a compromise. A group of stakeholders met over several years to develop the ordinance. We can’t compromise on the compromise.
  • It’s unrealistic to believe that development is being stopped by the PCCO.
  • We should actually strengthen PCCO by requiring on-site filters.
  • This is an example of paid staff from the development community trying to wear down citizens who have limited time to stay informed and involved in complicated issues. Citizens lose faith in the government and the process when this occurs.
  • We should rename PCCO to “Charlotte Stream Protection Law” so that citizens can recognize its importance.
  • This is an opportunity for the City Council to show environmental leadership and accountability.

Here’s the contact information for the Mayor and City Council:

Mayor

Daniel (Dan) Clodfelter

E-mail:  mayor@charlottenc.gov

Phone:  704-336-2241

Mayor Pro Tem

Michael Barnes

Email: barnesforcharlotte@gmail.com Phone: 704-509-6141

Council At-Large:

David Howard

Email: info@davidhowardclt.com Phone: 704-336-4099

Claire Green Fallon

Email: cfallon@charlottenc.gov Phone: 704-336-6105

Vi Lyles

Email: vlyles@charlottenc.gov Phone: 704-336-3431

District Representatives:

Patsy Kinsey, District 1

Email: pkinsey@charlottenc.gov Phone: 704-336-3432 or 704-376-5367

Al Austin, District 2

Email: aaustin@charlottenc.gov Phone: 704-336-3185

LaWana Mayfield, District 3

Email:     lmayfield@charlottenc.gov Phone:   704-336-3435 (office) or 704-352-7305 (cell)

Greg Phipps, District 4

Email: gaphipps@charlottenc.gov Phone: 704-336-3436

John Autry, District 5

Email: jautry@charlottenc.gov Phone: 704-336-2777

Kenny Smith, District 6

Email: krsmith@charlottenc.gov Phone: 704-336-3433

Ed Driggs, District 7

Email:ed@eddriggs.com Phone: 704-432-7077

This is critically important. If we lose this battle, we’ll lose the opportunity to clean-up our polluted streams. And one more thing. We need to know that you’ve taken action. Please copy David Robinson, Charlotte Sierra Club Group Chair, on your emails or let him know that you’ve made calls or sent letters. David’s email address is: takahula@gmail.com .

Take Action: Protect America’s Water and Children from Chemical Facilities

Saturday was the anniversary of the Clean Water Act. How about taking some action today!

Take Action: EPA must protect children from chemical facilities

Take Action: EPA Must Protect Children from Chemical Facilities

The statistics are staggering: One in three children in the United States attends a school within the danger zone of a hazardous chemical facility. Half of these kids (more than 10 million students) attend schools in the danger zone of more than one facility. After a massive explosion at a fertilizer plant in the town of West, Texas, last year, President Obama announced an executive order (#13650) instructing the Environmental Protection Agency to work with other government agencies to find ways to strengthen protections and prevent future disasters.

Take Action
The public comment period is closing soon, so send a note today and tell EPA Administrator McCarthy you support swift action and strong prevention requirements!

 

Take Action: Protect America's water

Take Action: Protect America’s Water

Forty years ago, two-thirds of America’s lakes, rivers and coastal waters were unsafe for fishing and swimming. Because of the Clean Water Act, that number has since been cut in half. However, one-third of our nation’s waters are still in trouble. The Obama administration has proposed a new protection to clarify which wetlands and streams in the U.S. are covered under the Clean Water Act. This proposal will finally restore protections, as originally intended, to almost all of the nation’s fresh waters — ensuring safe drinking water for 117 million Americans.

Take Action
The deadline for comments has been extended until November 14! Send a message to the EPA in support of its proposal to protect America’s streams and wetlands from dangerous pollution!

Save North Carolina’s Hofmann Forest – The Largest University Forest in the World

Please join me in signing a petition to save Hofman Forest!

For more information or to help with this campaign, contact Ron Sutherland at ron@wildlandsnetwork.org.

To learn more about the Hofman Forest, check out the great interactive active map below and the two recent updates about the sale.

Hofman Forest Map

Here are two recent updates about the sale of this North Carolina treasure.

NCSU ponders making Hofmann Forest error

Problem is, word leaked a while back that NCSU’s powers-that-be want to trade the forest to the Walker Agriculture Group of Illinois for a truckload of cash. The news got the school’s forestry professors and student body up in arms, not to mention conservationists and ecologists.

The real fly in the punch bowl is a development plan that includes roads, houses, shopping centers, a golf course and thousands of logged, crushed, burned, ripped and plowed acres to be planted in corn. Once “the plan” became public, the Wuffies denied they’d designed it, and the Walker group denied they’d made it. Walker also now denies any sort of “development” will occur at Hofmann Forest, but the terms of the sale don’t preclude the company doing whatever it wishes.

Because the White Oak and New rivers flow through Hofmann, development on a landscape scale almost certainly will cause trouble downstream: erosion, polluted water, high bacteria counts, beach closures. The Castle Hayne Aquifer that provides fresh water to several communities could also be affected. The forest acts as a filtering agent to prevent bad stuff from getting into the aquifer, the rivers, fish and, ultimately, the Atlantic Ocean.

and

Opponents to forest sale await rulings on assessment

The university has contended that the land is not “public” and not subject to the environmental assessment requirement under the State Environmental Policy Act, but Sutherland and the others have noted that the land has not been subject to taxation and that the state attorney general, Roy Cooper, has said he was obligated to handle the case for the university.

The university also faces a pending investigation by the federal Environmental Protection Agency, which is examining findings by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that indicate illegal wetlands ditching and draining has taken place in the forest.

While the university and Hofmann Forest LLC have contended the forest would be protected under the original sale, opponents have said there was nothing firm about that in the sale agreement, nor in the new one, and have pointed to leaked buyers’ prospectus circulated by Hofmann LLC to attract investors.

The prospectus mentioned the possibility of up to 2 million square feet of commercial development, possible construction of up to 10,500 residential units and the high-quality soils that would be conducive to farming if the trees were removed. The school and the LLC disavowed that prospectus.

“Also, consider this thought experiment,” Sutherland (Ron Sutherland, a conservation scientist for the Wildlands Network) said. “If another large tract of existing public forest, such as Croatan or Pisgah National Forest, were suddenly placed up for sale – of course we would fight such a plan tooth and nail – (and) if the relevant government leaders then announced a new plan where only one-fourth of the forest would be destroyed for sure, and the rest only ‘possibly,’ would anyone call that a victory for conservation? No, absolutely not. That would be a huge net loss of public forestland that citizens would find unacceptable. That is the alternative being proffered by NCSU now, with their revised Hofmann sale agreement, and we continue to reject their flawed premise that some loss of public forest is a necessary outcome of this situation.”

Please join me in signing a petition to save Hofman Forest!

Thanks, and spread the word to your friends on Facebook, etc!

 

 

ROBERT REDFORD: “Fracking Puts Our Drinking Water at Risk” (So Submit Comments on the NC Fracking Rules)

Just 2 days left (midnight, Sept 30th) to submit comments on the proposed NC fracking rules!

Submit Written Comments on Fracking Rules

Don’t forget, the Sept. 30th deadline for submitting written comments on the fracking rules is tomorrow! Check out the Frack Freee NC resource page here, for more information and bullet points to focus your comments on the rules.

To send a quick comment, go to Last Call for Fracking Comments – Sept 30th!

For more detailed taking points to really make an impression, click below and write and send a personal message!

NC Fracking RulesMEC-rules-1-page_WNC_8-28