Duke Energy/Dominion/Piedmont Natural Gas Pipeline – Communities Voice Opposition

In this update to the Duke Energy/Dominion/Piedmont Natural Gas Pipeline, check out:

  • Tri-State Alliance – No 42″ Pipeline Formed
  • Atlantic Coast Pipeline Project Gets Quick Reactions Across WV
  • Pipeline would lead to negative impacts on residential properties as well as water bodies and scenic areas
  • Virginia Wilderness Committee Opposes Pipeline – 6 Key Issues

If you missed the other updates, check them out at Duke Energy/Dominion Pipeline – N.C. Public Meetings, VA/WV Local Government and Community Reactions (Sept 13, 2014),  Opposition Growing in Virgina Over Atlantic Coast Pipeline (Sept 12, 2014), Update on Duke Energy/Dominion Fracking Gas Pipeline (Sept 10, 2014) and  “Fracking boom prompts $5B Dominion gas pipeline” (Sept 7, 2014).

 

Tri-State Alliance – No 42″ Pipeline Formed

A new Facebook page – Tri-State Alliance – No 42″ Pipeline – for

Tri State Pipeline FacebookTri-State Alliance – No 42″ Pipeline

 

Atlantic Coast Pipeline Project Gets Quick Reactions Across WV

Several groups, including West Virginia Wilderness Lovers, Friends of Blackwater and the Greenbrier River Watershed Association voiced opposition to the project, which would run through the Monongahela National Forest and George Washington National Forest.

Lauren Ragland with West Virginia Wilderness Lovers is focused on educating community members in ways Dominion and other gas companies are not, she said. She is concerned with the large 42 inch size of the pipe and the potential health effects it could have on local residents. She’s also concerned with where the pipeline goes — over Cheat Mountain, through national forests and historic places.

“There’s nothing in it for West Virginians,” Ragland said. “Other than [jobs created] during the construction phase and what we will be left with after that in royalties.” The reality of what happens with these pipeline projects, Ragland said, is there is permanent stream damage, additional storm water run-off that can create flooding in new areas and road damages.

In a letter to Sen. Jay Rockefeller D-W.Va., opposing the project, the Friends of Blackwater note the pipeline will cut through mountains at nearly 4,000 feet, the habitats of endangered species such as the Indiana and Virginia big-eared bat, the Cheat Mountain salamander and the West Virginia northern flying squirrel. The Friends of Blackwater letter also points out the project will cross six West Virginia rivers that provide clean drinking water for the region.
Read the full article at: http://www.frackcheckwv.net/2014/09/05/atlantic-coast-pipeline-project-gets-quick-reactions-across-wv/

 

Pipeline would lead to negative impacts on residential properties as well as water bodies and scenic areas

WV Pipeline Info

Dominion, Duke Energy, Piedmont Natural Gas and AGL Resources form joint venture to own Proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline

Groups like The Greenbrier River Watershed Association and WV Highlands Conservancy have stated that the pipeline would lead to negative impacts on residential properties as well as water bodies and scenic areas.

The pipeline would cross both the Monongahela National Forest and the George Washington National Forest in areas where there are ongoing trout and red spruce restoration projects. The pipeline would also cross numerous watersheds, rivers, streams, and springs, including the Tygart Valley River, Shavers Fork of the Cheat and West & East Forks of Greenbrier.

The Greenbrier River Watershed Association and WV Highlands Conservancy also noted that Dominion has never constructed a 42” pipeline, and there appears to be no precedent for a pipeline of this size across steep forested terrain like the Alleghenies. It would go straight up and down mountainsides which range from 3,400 to 4,700 feet in West Virginia and from 3,000 feet to 4,200 feet in Virginia.

Dominion Resources plans to make a pre-filing request with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) this fall on behalf of Atlantic Coast Pipeline, LLC. It expects to file its FERC application in the summer of 2015, receive the FERC Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity in the summer of 2016, and begin construction shortly thereafter.
Read the full article at: http://www.alleghenymountainradio.org/dominion-duke-energy-piedmont-natural-gas-and-agl-resources-form-joint-venture-to-own-proposed-atlantic-coast-pipeline/

 

Virginia Wilderness Committee Opposes Pipeline – 6 Key Issues

VWC opposes construction of the pipeline for the following reasons:

1.  Long-term detrimental impacts on plant and animal life, especially on the approximately 200 species already known to be endangered, threatened, rare, or declining in the GWNF, through:

  • Large-scale destruction, fragmentation, and degradation of habitat through edge effects reaching into adjoining forest;
  • Noise, night lights, and air emissions from compressors and other equipment located at intervals along the pipeline;
  • Chronic disturbance due to necessary pipeline monitoring, maintenance of non-woody cover (likely through use of aerial herbicide), and repair of potential leaks and explosions;
  • Disturbance of many unsuitable areas such as erosion-prone steep slopes, seeps, and springs;
  • Extreme disruption of many pristine and native trout streams, wetlands and riparian areas, though bedrock dynamiting and excavation;
  • Consequent erosion, sedimentation and hydrologic alteration affecting headwaters of drinking streams;
  • Long open entrance routes for a variety of nonnative, invasive species.

2.  Passage through Inventoried Roadless Areas and Special Biological Areas in the GWNF.

3.  Passage through “Biodiversity Hot Spots” identified by The Nature Conservancy and through “Outstanding Ecological Cores” identified by the VA Dept. of Conservation and Recreation;

4.  From the limited and imprecise information Dominion has provided the public, it appears the pipeline directly passes through several special areas identified in VWC’s publication, Virginia’s Mountain Treasures in the GWNF.

5.  Significant deterioration of nationally known and highly popular recreational features by passage across the Blue Ridge Parkway as well as the Great Eastern Trail, the Appalachian Trail, and several other well-traveled trails.

6.  Increased possibility of hydraulic fracturing and the extreme degradation this would cause.

Biodiversity Hotspots

biodiversity-hotspots-mapOutstanding Ecological Cores

1406217838More info at: http://www.vawilderness.org/dominion-pipeline.html

 

EPA Takes Real Steps Toward Curbing Smog Pollution – Now We Need Your Voice

Jasmine Smog

EPA Takes Real Steps Toward Curbing Smog Pollution – Now We Need Your Voice

September 11, 2014

The Environmental Protection Agency recently found that we’ve been doing it wrong for years; our air is not as clean or as safe as we once supposed. The agency’s smog pollution policy assessment, released in late August, found that current “safe” levels of smog pollution are actually not strong enough to protect our communities, our kids, or the air we breathe.

Doris Toles could tell you that.The Baltimore resident struggles with serious respiratory issues which are only made worse by the poor air quality in the city.

“I had my first asthma attack when I was two. I’m now living with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD),” says Doris. “A person gets COPD like I have after years of asthma attacks permanently weaken the lungs, and there is no cure.”

Doctors told Doris that her asthma is triggered by pollution in the air where she lives. “I have to be very careful and keep my inhaler close at hand on days when smog levels are high.”

When smog is inhaled, the harm it does has been likened to getting a sunburn on your lungs. Thankfully, we’ve got a chance to put things right. This December, the EPA will propose new smog pollution protections that can get America’s air quality back on track.

 “Safe” smog pollution levels were first lowered in 2008 from 88 parts per billion (ppb) to 75 ppb, but it turns out those protections were not enough to ensure clean, safe air for children and vulnerable populations living near the sources of this pollution. New recommendations from scientists since the 2008 protections have found that we need to ratchet them down to 60 ppb, in order to guard against dangerous air. The recent smog pollution policy assessment echoed this sentiment, recommending that the levels be reduced to a range of 60 to 70 ppb.

While we applaud the EPA’s assessment for acknowledging the need to strengthen the current safeguards, it’s important to note that the devil is in the details, which is why we need your help. Thousands of lives hang in the balance between 60 ppb and 70 ppb, and are pushing hard for the EPA to propose 60 ppb protections in December.

At Sierra Club, we have strongly advocated for a 60 ppb standard for years because the science is clear that it will better protect families from smog pollution from power plants and tailpipe emissions. Smog pollution can trigger respiratory problems like asthma attacks and cardiovascular problems. Over time, continued exposure can even lead to premature death.

Doris has lost friends and family to severe asthma attacks. For her and many others, it’s a matter of life and death. “Cleaning up this pollution helps people like me stay alive,” she says.

A 60 ppb standard would safeguard families, especially young children and the elderly, from these health hazards and save roughly $100 billion in health care costs. The EPA also estimates that cutting back to safer levels of smog pollution (60 ppb) would prevent 12,000 premature deaths, 21,000 hospitalizations and the stop the loss of 2.5 million work and school days each year. In view of this, the smog pollution policy assessment is an important step toward holding polluters accountable and lifting this huge burden off our communities.

In the months ahead, we work to secure the strongest possible protections for those who need them most. Let EPA know you support strong standards here.

–Mary Anne Hitt, Beyond Coal Campaign Director

Opposition Growing in Virginia Over Atlantic Coast Pipeline

This update on the Atlantic Coast pipeline includes:

  • Sierra Club Press Release
  • UVA scientist warns of dire environmental impacts if the proposed natural gas pipeline goes through Highland County
  • SELC Press Statement on Governor McAuliffe’s Announcement on Natural Gas Pipeline
  • Proposal for N.C. natural gas pipeline spawns concerns, environmental coalition
  • Coalition Forms Over Proposed Dominion Pipeline

For additional information, see the previous posts Update on Duke Energy/Dominion Fracking Gas Pipeline (Sept 10, 2014) and  “Fracking boom prompts $5B Dominion gas pipeline” (Sept 7, 2014)

No Pipeline Rally

Sierra Club Press Release:

The Piedmont Group of the Sierra Club is joining forces with the Friends of Nelson, the Augusta County Alliance and 350.org Central Virginia in opposition to the proposed Atlantic Coast pipeline.

Dominion Resources plans to partner with Duke Energy, Piedmont Natural Gas and AGL Resources on the 550-mile Atlantic Coast Pipeline that will stretch from Harrison County, West Virginia to Robeson County, N.C. The pipeline got the blessing of Democratic Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe last Tuesday.

The proposed project would be “a game changer” for Virginia industry and homeowners, Gov. Terry McAuliffe said last Tuesday at an announcement in the Capitol. “It will spur economic growth in all parts of the Commonwealth.”

Environmental and citizen-led community organizations in central and western Virginia have expressed strong opposition to the pipeline project. Major issues concerning the pipeline include property rights violations, property devaluation, impacts to tourism and agricultural-based economies of Nelson and Augusta Counties, public safety and environmental damage along the path of the pipeline to include contamination of local water supplies. Dominion alleges the legal right of entry to private property to survey for right-of-way easements as legislated by the General Assembly in 2004. Significant environmental damage could occur as a result of construction of the pipeline in karst topography, over mountainous terrain and through sensitive environmental areas including the George Washington and Monongahela National Forests, the Blue Ridge Parkway and the Appalachian Trail.

The Augusta County Alliance, formed in July to oppose the pipeline and preserve the rural character of the County, has rallied hundreds of citizens who are united in opposition to the project. “We have been making a very strong case that construction of a huge, 42-inch transmission pipeline through Augusta County will actually harm our rural economic sectors due to the destructive impact on farms, forests and private and public lands, while also creating serious safety concerns, and endangering our water that supplies most of the state,” said Nancy Sorrells, co-chair of the Alliance. Augusta County is slated for 43 miles of the proposed pipeline.

The project has already drawn strong opposition in Nelson County, where about 35 miles of the pipeline would run. Homes and businesses along state Route 151 and 29 sport blue placards that say, “No pipeline.” Thirteen landowners have filed lawsuits against Dominion for violating state law regarding survey of their property. Only twenty-five percent of the affected landowners in Nelson County have agreed to the survey of their property. Opposition has been so strong that surveying in the County has been put on hold several times. “We are very discouraged by the Governor’s support of this pipeline,” said Charlotte Rea, President of Friends of Nelson. “This pipeline will bring no economic gains or permanent jobs to Nelson County but will threaten our water supplies, devalue our property, endanger public safety and deface the landscapes and mountain vistas that are beloved by Nelson County residents and tourists alike and which are the lifeblood of our economy.”

The Piedmont Group of the Sierra Club strongly opposes the proposed Dominion pipeline. “The pipeline would incentivize more fracking across the region, continue to promote the use of fossil fuels and contribute significantly to environmental damage during construction,” said Kirk Bowers, Conservation Chair of the Piedmont Group. “We intend to fight the pipeline. Future generations depend on the outcome of our resolve.”

From: Environmental Groups Join Forces to Oppose Pipeline

 

UVA scientist warns of dire environmental impacts if the proposed natural gas pipeline goes through Highland County

August 25, 2014
Heather Niday

At their meeting on August 19th, Highlanders for Responsible Development [HRD] chairman Lewis Freeman said their group had yet to take a formal position on the Dominion Resources Southeast Reliability Project, a natural gas pipeline that would run through parts of West Virginia and Virginia, including Highland County.  Rick Webb, a member on the board of directors for HRD, a Highland County resident, and a senior scientist at the University of Virginia, has taken a formal position on the pipeline, one that is firmly in opposition.

Webb sees the pipeline putting the natural resources of the county in peril. Referring to a map of the proposed pipeline, Webb told the large crowd gathered at the Highland center that it would cross a considerable amount of sensitive habitat including sections of the George Washington national forest and Virginia wildlife management areas.   Webb showed pictures of a 42” natural gas pipeline under construction in Nebraska, saying a 42 foot wide trench was excavated to allow for construction of the pipeline.  Dominion is proposing to use a 42” pipeline in Pocahontas and Highland counties.  Webb said the trench needed for construction could be even wider than that used in Nebraska.  He said there may be no precedent for construction of such a large pipeline in steep terrain like that found in the Allegheny highlands.

42  inch pipeline under construction in Nebraska -  picture courtesy of Rick Webb

42 inch pipeline under construction in Nebraska – picture courtesy of Rick Webb

The pipeline path would cross eight Highland County mountain ridges at elevations of 3000 to 4200 feet:  Tamarack Ridge, Red Oak Knob, Lantz Mountain, Monterey Mountain, Jack Mountain, Doe Hill, Bullpasture Mountain and Shenandoah Mountain.  It’s not just the view shed that concerns Webb; he fears the resulting forest fragmentation caused by the construction of the pipeline could have adverse impacts on the flora and fauna of the region, including the loss of dependent species, the introduction of invasive species and the loss of habitat for sensitive species such as the Indiana bat and the Cow Knob salamander.

Webb said the Indiana bat, on the endangered species list, is known to inhabit a number of caves within 50 miles of the pipeline path.  Dominion may be required to get an Incidental Take Permit prior to construction.  The Cow Knob salamander is protected under a forest service conservation agreement  and has been observed in several areas close to the pipeline route.  Webb said the pipeline would also cross most of the major streams in the county, many of which also provide native brook trout habitat.

Of special concern to Webb is the Laurel Fork watershed, describing it as one of the most highly valued wild areas in Virginia and the state’s only example of an Alleghenian ecosystem with a multitude of known state rare species.

Karst terrain is another concern according to Webb, saying 50% of the county is underlain by the porous rock formations.   A large number of sinkholes have been mapped across the county, some in the vicinity of the pipeline route.  Dominion has proposed to monitor springs and wells within 200 feet of the pipeline, but Webb say that’s not sufficient given this kind of terrain.

Webb claims that what sets the proposal apart from other alternatives is that the route would cross 50 miles of national forest land and other areas set aside for conservation, would cross much of the best remaining wild landscape in the state, would affect multiple high quality streams and karst hydrology and could have adverse impacts on protected species.  In weighing all that he urges his fellow Highlanders to oppose the pipeline project.

Selected links to information on natural gas pipelines – courtesy of Highlanders for Responsible Development

Interstate natural gas pipeline on my land – what do I need to know?  Published by Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

www.ferc.gov/for-citizens/citizen-guides/citz-guide-gas.pdf

Dominion Resources link on the Southern Reliability Project

www.dom.com/business/gas-transmission/southeast-reliability-project/index.jsp

Virginia statute to permit natural gas companies to enter private property

http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+56-49.01

Gas transmission lines Q & A

www.forensic-appraisal.com/gas_pipelines­_q_a

Natural gas pipelines – a 2011 assessment by the Nature Conservancy, Pennsylvania Chapter of the impact of a new pipeline built in Bradford County, PA

www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/pennsylvania/ng-pipelines.pdf

Gas pipeline boom fragmenting Pennsylvania’s forests

www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-12-10/gas-pipeline-boom-fragmenting-pennsylvania-s-forests.html

A pipeline threatens our family land

www.nytimes.com/2014/07/13/opinion/sunday/a-pipeline-threatens-our-family-land.html?module=Search&mabReward=relbias%3Ar%2C{%221%22%3A%22RI%3A11%22}&_r=0

 

Press Statement on Governor McAuliffe’s Announcement on Natural Gas Pipeline

Charlottesville, VA – The following is a statement from Greg Buppert, senior attorney at the Southern Environmental Law Center:

We are disappointed that the Governor pledged his support today for a major gas pipeline through Virginia’s forests, particularly in light of the potential impacts on the beloved George Washington National Forest, also known as the GW. Dominion’s proposed pipeline would traverse the Allegheny and Blue Ridge mountains through three counties (Highland, Augusta, and Nelson), as well as the Shenandoah Valley. It crosses prime recreational and biological and recreational areas in the national forest, including much of the best remaining wild landscape in Virginia. It is also proposed through one of Virginia’s most rugged landscapes, crossing numerous ridgelines over 3000 feet and raising serious questions about whether it can be built without significant damage to pristine forests and rivers.

Given these potential impacts, the project has generated a chorus of citizen opposition throughout the state. Dominion has not publically identified a customer in Highland, Nelson, and Augusta counties for the gas carried by the pipeline, and the project threatens the integrity of the region’s public lands and communities with few, if any, apparent long-term economic benefits.

In the past, Governor McAuliffe has voiced strong support for protecting the GW from other industrial development in the form of shale gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing. In light of the expected damaging impacts of the proposed pipeline, we urge the Governor will keep his pledge to the citizens of the Commonwealth to protect the GW, a treasured natural resource that hosts more than a million visitors annually and anchors a vital, agriculture and tourism-based economy for the Shenandoah Valley and surrounding communities.

https://www.southernenvironment.org/news-and-press/press-releases/press-statement-on-governor-mcauliffes-announcement-on-natural-gas-pipeline-1

 

Proposal for N.C. natural gas pipeline spawns concerns, environmental coalition
September 9, 2014
A staff and wire report

RICHMOND, Va.- Citing grave concerns, 22 conservation and environmental groups in Virginia and West Virginia are teaming up following the announcement of a proposed $5 billion natural gas pipeline that would end in Robeson County.

Allegheny-Blue Ridge Alliance members are fearful the path of the 550-mile energy project will trample on some of the most ecologically sensitive areas in the Eastern United States. The coalition has not taken a stand on the pipeline.The project was announced last week by Virginia’s Dominion Resources, Duke Energy and other partners. The pipeline would connect the Southeast with rich supplies of natural gas being produced in Ohio, West Virginia and Pennsylvania.

The Atlantic Coast Pipeline would begin Harrison County, West Virginia, and stretch through Virginia and North Carolina.

In North Carolina, the pipeline would wind through parts of Halifax, Nash, Wilson, Johnston, Sampson and Cumberland counties before ending in Robeson County. It will run mostly underground and will be designed to transport 1.5 billion cubic feet of natural gas on a daily basis.

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory said last week that the proposed line “will bring hundreds of jobs and hundreds of millions of dollars of economic activity” to the state.

The project is expected to create nearly 740 jobs annually in North Carolina during the construction phase, according to the Governor’s Office. The economic impact for the state would be $680million, McCrory said.

A total of 52 permanent jobs statewide will be created after construction is complete, the Governor’s Office said.

Before work can begin, state and federal regulators must approve the project. If approved, the pipeline could be in service by late 2018.

http://www.fayobserver.com/news/local/proposal-for-n-c-natural-gas-pipeline-spawns-concerns-environmental/article_3b04e692-0575-512a-b2bd-5da7d75d0340.html

 

Coalition Forms Over Proposed Dominion Pipeline
September 8, 2014

A coalition of 22 organizations from across Virginia and West Virginia has formed the Allegheny-Blue Ridge Alliance in response to the September 2 announcement of the proposed 550-mile natural gas pipeline from Harrison County, WV, to Robeson County, NC. Dubbed the “Atlantic Coast Pipeline” by its proponents, the project is a joint venture of Dominion Resources, Duke Energy, Piedmont Natural Gas and AGL Resources.  The companies have not yet applied for a permit from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.  Contrary to recent suggestions, construction of the project is not a certainty.

The Alliance and its member organizations are gravely concerned about the proposed route of the pipeline, which could disrupt some of the most ecologically sensitive areas in the Eastern United States, including more than 50 miles of public lands in the George Washington and Monongahela national forests.  Further, much of the pipeline’s path, particularly in Highland and Augusta Counties in Virginia, would be built over fragile karst topography, a landscape formed from the dissolution of soluble rocks and characterized by underground drainage systems with sinkholes and caves.  The impact on area water supplies of a pipeline built over such unstable geological formations could be significant.  It could also present serious safety hazards to the pipeline.

Alliance members are also acutely concerned that the proposed project presents substantial unjustified risks and costs for the rural communities of the Allegheny-Blue Ridge region. These communities will bear the full impact of pipeline development, including the loss of private property, damage to their scenic landscape, and the risk of pollution, with few, if any, of the long-term economic benefits touted by proponents.

Founding members of the Allegheny-Blue Ridge Alliance are:

Allegheny Highlands Alliance

Augusta County Alliance

Conservation Partners

Cooper Conservation Advisors, LLC

Cowpasture River Preservation Association

Friends of Blackwater

Friends of Nelson County

Friends of Shenandoah Mountain

Friends of the Middle River

Greenbrier River Watershed Association

Highlanders for Responsible Development

Jackson River Preservation Association

Shenandoah Group of the Sierra Club

Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation

Shenandoah Valley Network

Southern Environmental Law Center

Valley Conservation Council

Virginia Wilderness Committee

West Virginia Environmental Council

West Virginia Highlands Conservancy

West Virginia Rivers Coalition

Wild Virginia

https://www.southernenvironment.org/news-and-press/press-releases/coalition-forms-over-proposed-dominion-pipeline

City of Charlotte Throwing $1000s Away

The City of Charlotte is wasting thousands of taxpayer dollars by the lack of policies and programs to conserve energy across our community.

The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy has issued a report for Charlotte’s Energy Efficiency programs and it’s bad. Really bad!!

Charlotte scored 23.75 points out of a possible 100 points.

Charlotte ranked 31st out of 34 major metropolitan cites.

We hope that Charlotte elected officials and staff will review this report and decided to get serious about energy efficiency. Click below to see how we did in each of 5 areas. Let your elected City officials and staff know that we want to save energy, save money, and save the environment.

Energy Efficiency is ‘Cheapest Fuel’

ACEEE-Energy-Manage1http://www.energymanagertoday.com/energy-efficiency-is-cheapest-fuel-099803/

City of Charlotte Total Score – 23.75 out of 100

Charlotte City Scorecard Rank – 31 out of 34 major metropolitan areas

Charlotte EE Ranking

LCO EE

CWE EE

BP EE

EWU EE

T EE

Read the full report at: http://database.aceee.org/city/charlotte-nc#sthash.2vwIyHiv.dpuf

EPA Clean Power Plan Background Information

Check out these Sierra Club resources on the EPA Clean Power Plan. Put this information to use tonight, Sept 9th!

Citizen’s Climate Hearing
September 9th
6:00-8:00 p.m.
Myers Park Baptist Church
Heaton Hall
1900 Queens Rd, Charlotte, NC 28207

Free Solar Tours preceding the hearing – 5:00 and 5:30 PM

Hearing Format
•    Please limit oral comments to 3 minutes (typically 400 – 450 words)
•    Please bring a copy of prepared comments for the court reporter (optional)
•    Written comments may be of any length and submitted without public speaking

New EPA rules on carbon will benefit economy

New EPA rules on carbon will benefit economy

Thanks to Joel Olsen, president at Cornelius-based O2energies Inc., for speaking out in the Charlotte Business Journal opinion – New EPA rules on carbon will benefit economy!

Won’t you stand with Joel and others from across the state and speak out tomorrow, September 9th, at the Charlotte Citizen’s Climate Hearing (see flyer below for more information)?

Citizen’s Climate Hearing
September 9th
6:00-8:00 p.m.
Myers Park Baptist Church
Heaton Hall
1900 Queens Rd, Charlotte, NC 28207

Free Solar Tours preceding the hearing – 5:00 and 5:30 PM

Hearing Format
•    Please limit oral comments to 3 minutes (typically 400 – 450 words)
•    Please bring a copy of prepared comments for the court reporter (optional)
•    Written comments may be of any length and submitted without public speaking

 

New EPA rules on carbon will benefit economy

VIEWPOINT – Sept 5, 2014
Joel Olsen

With the recent announcement of new federal rules to reduce carbon dioxide, market opportunities will open for clean energy, which is good news for North Carolina.

Our already booming solar industry ranks second in the nation for utility-scale capacity. Our state hosts more than 18,000 full-time jobs in the clean-energy sector.

The Environmental Protection Agency’s rules create an opportunity for renewable-energy and energy-efficiency businesses, as well as natural gas and nuclear, to play an increasingly important role in the transition to a low-carbon future.

The EPA rules also will help level the playing field both nationally and on the global stage where U.S. industry must compete.

Take our automobile industry as an example. When lax domestic regulations allowed automakers to produce cars with lower fuel efficiency in the U.S. market, they quickly found that those cars could not be sold in foreign markets with higher fuel-efficiency standards. Instead of boosting efficiency, the U.S. auto industry lost market share, jobs and investor confidence as it tried to protect itself from being held to the regulatory requirements of its global competitors.

The new rules set national standards to reduce emissions from the generation of electricity, the largest source of carbon in the country. These stricter requirements will promote innovation, investment and jobs in America for clean-energy business while reducing emissions that cause pollution and global warming.

For O2energies, a developer and owner of solar farms in the Southeast, the new rules provide a clear market signal to our investors, suppliers and contractors that they should invest in projects, manufacture products and add jobs.

Thanks again Joel!

 

Charlotte Citizens Climate Hearing

“Fracking boom prompts $5B Dominion gas pipeline”

See below for the following stories and information:

  • Fracking boom prompts $5B Dominion gas pipeline
  • Map of the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline
  • Dominion Site website pipeline information link
  • Duke Energy website pipeline information link
  • NC News Coverage
    • 5 Public meetings – Sept 22,23,25
    • NC News Coverage
    • Second major gas pipeline to enter NC
    • Dominion Resources will build 550-mile natural gas pipeline into NC
    • McCrory praises eastern NC natural gas pipeline
    • McCrory: Proposed Gas Pipeline To Bring Economic Benefits To Region
  • VA News Coverage
    • Dominion Gas Pipeline:  Bad news and a call to action!
    • McAuliffe boosts gas pipeline but environmental groups dissent
    • Controversial natural gas pipeline through Virginia draws governor’s backing, fracking opponents’ ire
    • New Natural Gas Pipeline Would Run Through The George Washington National Forest
    • VA Sierra Club Newsletter Summer 2014

 

This lead story sums up what we’re facing. Below you’ll find a pipeline map, information from the Dominion and Duke Energy websites, links to recent news articles, and dates and times for the 5 public meetings to be held in eastern North Carolina this month. Stay tuned, more information to follow.


Fracking boom prompts $5B Dominion gas pipeline

Spurred by the nation’s fracking boom, Dominion proposed Tuesday its largest natural gas pipeline — a nearly $5 billion project to move vast supplies produced in the mid-Atlantic to the Southeast.
“This will be one of the largest pipelines to take advantage of the abundant supply of natural gas in the Marcellus and Utica shale fields in West Virginia, Ohio and Pennsylvania,” says Dominion spokesman Jim Norvelle.
Santa (Donald Santa, president and CEO of the Interstate Natural Gas Association of America, an industry group) says he doesn’t expect the pipeline to engender the same controversy that has held up approval of the northern leg of the Keystone pipeline, which would carry tar sands oil from Canada to the upper Midwest.
“It’s a different situation,” he says, noting the Dominion-led project does not cross a national border so it does not need an environmental review and permit from the U.S. State Department. He says FERC has a good track record of authorizing gas pipelines, and there’s public demand for natural gas deliveries.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2014/09/02/fracking-5b-dominion-gas-pipeline/14962483/

Atlantic Coast Pipeline

atlantic-coast-pipeline-map

Dominion Site
https://www.dom.com/business/gas-transmission/atlantic-coast-pipeline/index.jsp

Duke Site
Duke Energy, Piedmont Natural Gas select Dominion to build
The Atlantic Coast Pipeline will meet those objectives by roughly paralleling
the underscored the national need for more natural gas pipelines

[PDF] Barclays Capital CEO Energy-Power Conference September
Page 5. Atlantic Coast Pipeline to benefit customers and regional economies –
On Sept. and operate the Atlantic Coast Pipeline – Project Overview:

NC News

Public meetings

Additional details about Atlantic Coast Pipeline can be found at https://www.dom.com/business/gas-transmission/atlantic-coast-pipeline/index.jsp. The company also will hold a series of town-hall style informational meetings with North Carolina residents who live near the proposed pipeline route. The meetings start at 5 p.m. for landowners in the study corridor and at 6:30 for the general public.

Sept. 22

• UNC Pembroke, COMTech Regional Center, Pembroke

• Rose Hill Plantation, Nashville

Sept. 23

• Holiday Inn Fayetteville I-95 South, Fayetteville

• The Centre at Halifax Community College, Weldon

Sept. 25

•  Johnston County Agricultural Center, Smithfield

Second major gas pipeline to enter NC
http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/09/02/5144589/dominion-to-build-and-operate.html

Dominion Resources will build 550-mile natural gas pipeline into NC
http://www.newsobserver.com/2014/09/02/4115878_duke-energy-and-partners-to-build.html

McCrory praises eastern NC natural gas pipeline
http://www.newsobserver.com/2014/09/02/4116988/mccrory-praises-eastern-nc-natural.html

McCrory: Proposed Gas Pipeline To Bring Economic Benefits To Region
http://www.wilmingtonbiz.com/more_news/2014/09/02/mccrory_proposed_gas_pipeline_to_bring_economic_benefits_to_region/12263

VA News
Dominion Gas Pipeline:  Bad news and a call to action!
http://www.friendsofshenandoahmountain.org/news

McAuliffe boosts gas pipeline but environmental groups dissent
http://fairfaxnews.com/2014/09/mcauliffe-boosts-gas-pipeline-environmental-groups-dissent/

Controversial natural gas pipeline through Virginia draws governor’s backing, fracking opponents’ ire
http://www.wjla.com/articles/2014/09/controversial-natural-gas-pipeline-through-virginia-draws-governor-s-backing-fracking-opponents-ire-.html

New Natural Gas Pipeline Would Run Through The George Washington National Forest
http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/09/02/3478041/atlantic-coast-pipeline/

VA Sierra Club Newsletter Summer 2014

VA Pipeline