* October 23 Meeting Presentations – Great info!

“Fantastic presentation!”

“All this finally made sense”

These were a couple of the comments about the presentation by Mary Olson of NIRS. Thanks so much Mary! Also joining us for the meeting was  Susan Corbett, national chair for the Sierra Club Nuclear Free Campaign. Thanks Susan!

Check out the business presentation about elections, outings, conservation issues and more (click below).

Oct 2013 Business MeetingCPG Meeting 2013 Oct

Below is a copy of the excellent presentation by Mary Olson that she has kindly provided for us. If you have questions (there were some great questions during the program), email Mary at maryo@nirs.org.

Mary Olson PresentationWaste Confidence

Below are excerpts from Mary’s presentation that highlight the talking points for the upcoming NRC Public Comment Meeting in Charlotte.

A large public outcry is needed to prevent the NRC from implementing a new “Waste Confidence” rule. It is critical that you attend the “waste confidence” meeting in Charlotte.  Even if you do not wish to speak, your presence tells the NRC that you care. You can also bring signs for outside the meeting room.

Charlotte

Monday, November 4

Hilton Charlotte University Place
8629 J.M. Keynes Drive
Charlotte, NC  28262

Outside gathering and rally 5 pm

Open house 6-7 pm

Meeting 7-10 pm

The NRC requests that if you wish to speak, you register beforehand. Your choices are:

NRC Meeting Talking PointsNRC Waste Confidence Meeting Talking Points

* Meeting Tonight – “Nuclear Power in the Carolinas – Wasting Away or a Glowing Threat?” – Oct 23

You don’t want to miss this meeting tonight! See you there!

Duke Evac Plan McGuire

What’s going on with nuclear power in North Carolina?   Even the former chair of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) says the nuclear industry is dying1 and yet Duke wants to build two nuclear reactors just south of Charlotte in Gaffney2.  After decades of no permanent solution, nuclear fuel is building up in NC3 and most of it is in hazardous spent fuel pools4.  Are the nuclear reactors surrounding Charlotte at risk5 and are we prepared for a nuclear emergency in Charlotte6?  What are the issues?  What can we do about it7?

Join us Wednesday, October 23, to hear “Nuclear Power in the Carolinas – Wasting Away or a Glowing Threat?” with Mary Olson. Mary has been on the staff of Nuclear Information and Resource Service (NIRS) for twenty-two years, serving as staff biologist, radioactive waste specialist and since 1999, the Director of the Southeast Office. As young research assistant Olson suffered a radiation accident; Dr. Helen Caldicott’s book, Nuclear Madness restored her perspective and set her on the path of work to protect others from ionizing radiation. Mary has done so by educating the public, congress, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and now the rising generation of activists.

Our meeting starts off at 6:30 PM with pizza, refreshments and a chance to meet and socialize with other Sierra Club members and friends. The business meeting and program will begin at 7:00 PM. Non-members and potential new members are very welcome!

Central Piedmont Sierra Club meetings are held in the Mahlon Adams Pavilion at Freedom Park, 2435 Cumberland Avenue, Charlotte, NC, 28203. Cumberland Avenue is off of the 1500 block of East Boulevard.

The program is free and open to the public and you do not have to be a member to attend. Free parking is available.

Bring a friend or two; you’ll be glad you did! See you there…

Additional information

1. Former NRC Chairman Says U.S. Nuclear Industry is “Going Away” “This is not a future technology. It’s an old technology, and it serves a useful purpose. But that purpose is running its course.” “The industry is going away,” he said bluntly. “Four reactors are being built, but there’s absolutely no money and no desire to finance more plants than that.

2. Duke Energy continues to support Lee nuke plant That Duke proclaims the continued viability of nuclear in all sorts of forums — from its annual analysts meeting several months ago to a small chamber meeting this week — indicates how seriously Duke takes the need to keep its options open on Lee.

3. N.C. brims with nuclear waste The state ranks fourth in the nation for accumulated nuclear waste.

4. Nuclear Power Safety in North Carolina

5. NC’s 3 Nuclear Plants Report More Than 90 Violations The three nuclear power plants in North Carolina have each reported at least 90 safety violations since 2000. The Government Accountability Office report obtained by The Associated Press shows that the McGuire plant near Charlotte reported 119 lower–level violations and one higher-level violation from 2000 to 2012.

6. In the event of a nuclear accident, is Charlotte ready? Duke Energy hires a consultant to estimate evacuation times for McGuire and Catawba Nuclear Stations. The most recent evacuation time estimates for McGuire predict everyone within a ten-mile radius of the plant could get out within six hours at most. The projection takes into account severe weather and large gatherings at places like Davidson Stadium, the Metorlina Expo and the Renaissance Fair simultaneously. But the report is based on 2004 traffic counts. In a real emergency, the best laid plans would run headlong into real traffic.

7. NRC Nuclear Waste Meeting – Charlotte, Nov 4 Come speak out on this issue!

* Background Information on Nuclear Waste

Below are some suggested comments, talking points, and background information on nuclear waste and the upcoming NRC Nuclear Waste Meeting to be held in Charlotte on November 4.

To learn much more about this issue, plan to attend the Sierra Club monthly meeting, “Nuclear Power in the Carolinas – Wasting Away or a Glowing Threat?” – Oct 23.

What is Waste Confidence and What are these hearings about?

What is Waste Confidence

Talking Points on NRC’s Waste Confidence Policy

Waste Confidence Policy Talking Points

Sample Comments for NRC Waste Confidence Meetings

Sample Comments Waste Confidence

Dry Casks versus Fuel Pools

Dry Casks vs Fuel Pools

Spent Fuel Pool Fires

Spent Fuel Pool Fires

Spent Nuclear Fuel in the US (Full Report)

Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in US

Spent Nuclear Fuel in the US (Summary)

Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in US Summary

America’s Nuclear Spent-Fuel Time Bombs Spent Fuel Bombs

Risk From Spent Nuclear Reactor Fuel Is Greater in U.S. Than in Japan, Study Says

Spent Fuel Risk

Reference:

What is Waste Confidence

NRC Waste Confidence Backgrounder NIRS

Sample comments for NRC Waste Confidence meetings

Dry Casks vs Fuel Pools Backgrounder NIRS

Spent Fuel Pool Fires Backgrounder NIRS

Spent Nuclear Fuels in US Robert Alvarez May 2011

Spent Nuclear Fuels in US Robert Alvarez May 2011 Fact Sheet

Americas Nuclear Spent Fuel Time Bombs

Risk From Spent Nuclear Reactor Fuel

* Take Action: Nuclear waste in our communities?

Sierra Club - Explore, enjoy and protect the planet

Dear Friends,

Take action to protect our communities from nuclear waste!Leslie March and her mother
Leslie March and her mother in 1955
btn_takeaction_orange

I first learned about “atomic waste” in my high chair; I grew up in the fifties in Washington State and my grandfather frequently had business at the Hanford Reservation (now the most contaminated nuclear waste site in North America). I remember my mother arguing with him about the dangers of nuclear waste: she was concerned about the health of the Columbia River; he trusted that the plant would be safe.

But my mother was right: the tanks containing highly radioactive waste are leaking, and the Columbia River is at risk.1

We now have the opportunity to protect communities across the nation from radioactive waste. Please take action today!

The reactors at Hanford are now closed. But when I discovered that another nuclear reactor (the same kind used at Fukushima) now operates within miles of the Columbia River, I was motivated to take action to protect the river, and began organizing in my community. I was dismayed when the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) recently relicensed the Columbia Generating Station for another 20 years — even though they don’t have a solid plan for storing the waste safely.

Fortunately the courts are now requiring the NRC to have a moratorium on licensing until they do an environmental impact statement on the radioactive waste. Now we have a chance to protect the river by demanding that the waste be stored safely.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is now developing new rules for the long-term storage of highly radioactive waste from the nation’s nuclear reactors. These rules will determine whether or not your state becomes a transportation route for thousands of shipments of highly radioactive waste on super-trucks, or a storage site for some or all of the 70,000+ tons of radioactive waste.

The federal government is now taking public comments on these rules: please tell the NRC to enact strong rules to protect our communities and environment.

We have a very unique opportunity to have a say in how our country handles radioactive waste from nuclear reactors in the future.  If we don’t step up and comment, we will have lost our ability to protect our grandchildren, and many generations to come, from the deadly dangers of radiation.

Let the NRC know that we are not confident with the current way they have regulated radioactive waste – they need to do more.

Thank you for everything you do for the environment,

Leslie March
Sierra Club Nuclear Program Volunteer Lead

P.S. After you’ve taken action, pleaseforward a copy of this messageto five of your friends and family. Or spread the word on your social networks with the share buttons below.

Share this page on FacebookShare this page on TwitterShare this page with other services

[1] “Hanford Nuclear Reservation Tanks Leaking Radioactive Waste Underground, Governor Inslee Says,” AP/Huffington Post, February 22, 2013.

* NC Sierra Club Footnotes Online – October 2013

NC Chapter LogoFriends,

Autumn often brings thoughts of family, food, and friends. That may be due to the concentration of holidays or it may be that the shorter days feed the need to circle oneself with comfortable people and surroundings. And Sierrans are no different.

In this edition of Footnotes Online, we will recap some recent events that Sierrans participated in, offer a list of upcoming items of interest for your consideration, and tell you about a new benchmark you helped the Sierra Club reach. So our question to you is: Are you ready to embrace the season and surround yourself with friendly faces wanting to create some good in the world? If so, maybe we will see you at one of these events!

Cheers,

Your staff at the NC Sierra Club

We’ve Done the Math, and It’s Starting to Add Up

You probably know that Sierrans have played a leading role in retiring coal plants in North Carolina. But did you know that last week, when Brayton Point Power Station announced its retirement, Somerset, Massachusetts became the 150th community to move beyond coal? This is huge! Let’s look at some numbers to see how we got here.

Over 154,000 activists took action in communities across the country, creating over 100 partnerships with community and national organizations, and taking more than 4.6 million actions online.

Closing 150 coal fired power plants has saved billions of dollars in health care costs, lowered carbon pollution by 225 million tons and saved over 4,000 lives.

The result is that we have healthier and happier communities, and we are propelling the clean energy economy which has generated more than 200,000 jobs across the country.

Check out the infographic below for great facts about this important work and share the image with your friends! And click here to join the Asheville Beyond Coal movement and help take back our mountains!

150-coal-plants-retired (1).jpg

Time to Solarize

FIS square logo.jpg

By now, you probably know a lot about solar energy in our state. For instance, you’ve probably heard that North Carolina ranked 5th in the country last year for solar installations. And you likely know that June was Solar Month in North Carolina.

But what you may not know is that it is illegal in our state for a solar company to sell you electricity directly! That’s right. Solar companies have to sell the power they harness to a utility that in turn sells it to consumers. Click here to watch our video about Third Party Sales of electricity.

But until that changes, there’s a group of folks working to find solutions to help homeowners take advantage of the dropping prices of installing solar panels. A new initiative in Western NC is getting a lot of attention for its effort to help residents work together to get lower prices and good loans to install solar panels on their roofs.

More than 300 people signed up for the Solarize Asheville project, and Solarize Carrboro is working to get off the ground.  For more information about the Solarize Carrboro effort, please visit: http://www.solarizenc.org/carrboro.

Working together, we can make North Carolina First In Solar!

Looking for Answers

As we move toward wind and solar, we still have the problem of no solution for nuclear waste. And right now, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is holding hearings on its draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) in cities all across the country. The hearing in Charlotte will be on November 4!

The hearings provide the public an opportunity to comment on a generic draft EIS being issued by the NRC to justify “confidence” that waste will be taken care of therefore can continue to be generated. The results of these hearings could restart licensing new and extending licenses of old nuclear power reactors in the US.

Nuclear Free Logo.jpg

For information put together by Sierra Club volunteers including some background on Waste Confidence, please click here: http://content.sierraclub.org/grassrootsnetwork/documents/background-waste-confidence.

Talking points and comment instructions for Waste Confidence Hearings can be found here: http://content.sierraclub.org/grassrootsnetwork/documents/talking-points-and-comment-instructions-waste-confidence-hearings.

Now that you’ve got that, go ahead and mark your calendar for:

November 4 - 6:00 – 7:00 p.m. Open House, 7:00 – 10:00 p.m. Hearing

Hilton Charlotte University Place, 8629 J.M. Keynes Drive, Charlotte, NC 28262 (map)

If you want to join other Sierrans who are standing up against the dangerous practice of nuclear energy, join the Nuclear Free Campaign today!

Visit the campaign’s Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/groups/NuclearFreeCampaign/) or webpage (http://sierraclub.org/nuclear/) for more information and the latest developments!

A New Class of Leaders

CH Outing Training 2013.jpg

Outings connect the Sierra Club’s past, present, and future. Getting outdoors is why the Club started and it is still what inspires our conservation efforts today. On October 5, thirty-nine aspiring and current North Carolina Outings Leaders came together in Chapel Hill for a day of Outdoor Leadership training. Eight of North Carolina’s local Sierra Club groups were represented—with participants traveling from areas all across the state!

And just as it was with John Muir, Ansel Adams, and the countless others who have allowed their love for outdoors to reach others and inspire conservation efforts, North Carolina has a new flock of leaders. And that’s something for which we should all be thankful!

Special thanks for conducting the training go to the NC Chapter Outings Committee members: Kelly Mieszkalski (Chair), Nancy Card (Vice Chair), Bill Gupton, Debra Rezeli, and Ginny Kloepfer. Durham Technical Community College provided first aid training for the volunteers. We thank them, as well!

Where We Are on the Frack Track

Fracking Timeline small.jpg

For more than two years now, there has been a push to allow fracking in North Carolina. During this time several bills have been introduced, DENR did a fracking study, and the legislature created a Mining & Energy Commission (MEC) to develop draft rules for potentially allowing fracking in our state.

If you are looking to stay on top of all of these fracking items of interest, going to a MEC meeting is a good way to keep tabs on what rules are being developed. Those meetings are listed below and you can click this link for more information about the MEC meetings: http://is.gd/1YZuzd.

Also, click on the picture to the right to see our newly updated fracking timeline!

Meetings of the Mining & Energy Commission

October 24-25 – Archdale Building  – 512 N. Salisbury St., Raleigh, NC

MEC Committees and study groups will meet on the 24th. The full MEC will meet on the 25th and is expected to have a final discussion on their proposed chemical disclosure rules.

These rules, if adopted by the General Assembly, would determine the what information fracking companies would have to make available about the chemicals they plan to use.

November 21-22 – Archdale Building – 512 N. Salisbury St., Raleigh, NC

MEC Committees and study groups will meet on the 21st. The full MEC will meet on the 22nd and their proposed rules for fracking well development are due at this meeting, although the MEC can change this deadline if they choose.

Upcoming Events & Meetings Worth Mentioning

Triangle Area Events

October 17, 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. – UUFR – 3313 Wade Avenue, Raleigh, North Carolina (map)

Capital Group October Monthly Meeting: “For Earth’s Sake: The Life and Times of David Brower”.

Join the group this Thursday for a showing of “For Earth’s Sake: The Life and Times of David Brower”! “For Earth’s Sake” is a documentary profiling David Brower, the environmentalist who established several of America’s parks and who has directed two of the world’s most influential environmental organizations, including the Sierra Club.

Stick around afterward for refreshments and a chance to socialize with fellow Sierrans. Announcements and Sierra Club updates will precede the screening of the movie.

For more information: https://www.facebook.com/events/524851234251647/.

November 7, 4:00 – 6:00 p.m. – Marbles Museum in Raleigh – $50 registration fee

Community Summit on why Transit Makes $en$e: What’s in it for Me, Business, & the Economy

Local business leaders and planning professionals explain why transit is critical for our community’s future. Keynote speaker Will Shroeer, from the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, is an expert on how transit investment directly benefits local economic development. Carolyn Flowers, CEO of Charlotte’s transit system, will describe the economic success of Charlotte’s expanding light rail and streetcars.

Click here for more details on other speakers!

Transit-Makes-Sense-Banner.jpg

November 13, 4:00 p.m. – Chapel Hill/Durham Area

Outing – Second Wednesday Winter Hike Series - November – February

The days are getting shorter, but if you’re looking for ways to keep yourself conditioned during the week, join like-minded folks for a 3-mile fast-paced nature hike on the second Wednesday of each month from November through February. Locations vary, but will be on wooded trails somewhere between Hillsborough, UNC and Duke campuses. Limited to 12 participants. Sorry, no pets. To register, contact Jae at SeeingTrees@gmail.com. You can also check the Outings Calendar for updated information: http://nc2.sierraclub.org/outings-calendar.

Coastal Events

October 19, 2013 – 1:45 – 4:00 – Hammock’s Beach State Park, Swansboro, NC

Hammocks Beach.jpg

Outing – Marsh Cruise at Hammock’s Beach State Park

Learn about the ecology and cultural history of coastal North Carolina as you enjoy the wildlife and scenery of Swansboro and Hammocks Beach State Park by ferry. The trip is open to everyone. The ride begins at 2:00 p.m. and runs for about 2 hours. Gather at the park visitor’s center at 1:45 p.m. The cost is $5 per person to benefit a local charity.

For more information, or to sign up, contact Nancy Card at nostalgicnan@gmail.com.

October 26, 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. – Time for Science Learning Center – Grifton, NC (map)

Outing – John Lawson Days Paddle

Activities are scheduled in Grifton, NC to commemorate  naturalist and explorer John Lawson’s time in the area. This is an opportunity for Sierra Club members to join in by attending lectures on this history (10:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.), a field trip to Fort Barnwell of the Tuscarora War (4:00 p.m.), and a 9:00 a.m. Sierra Club paddle down Contentnea Creek (dependent on creek conditions at the time!!). Details of Lawson Day can be found by clicking here: http://johnlawsonlegacydays.org/Schedule_of_Events.html.

Sign up for the paddle with Tom Williams at twill@earthlink.net and provide your cell phone number in case of a need to cancel due to creek status. Paddlers will meet at the green trailer on the Time For Science campus in the Grifton area at 8:45 a.m.

November 9, 9:30 a.m.- Cape Fear River, Wilmington, NC

Toxic Tour Boat Trip

By the end of the year the Sutton Coal Plant in Wilmington is switching away from coal, one of the dirtiest fuels from start to finish. But for decades tons of toxic coal waste, containing harmful heavy metals, have been dumped in unlined pits that threaten local clean water. And Progress Energy still has not decided what to do about this legacy of pollution in the community.

The NC Sierra Club and Cape Fear River Watch are teaming up for a trip on the Cape Fear River to the Sutton Coal plant. The trip will educate the community on the dangers of coal waste and what we can do to overcome the legacy of coal in our community. Wilmington deserves clean safe drinking water, sign up for our toxic tour today and learn how to protect our vital water resources. The trip will last two hours, the cost is $10.

For more information, or to sign up, contact Nancy Card, NostalgicNan@gmail.com.

Events In the Mountains

October 20 – Grandfather Mountain, NC

Outing – Tanawha Trail and Fall Color Hike

This should be a great opportunity to view the colorful fall foliage on the Blue Ridge Parkway. The Tanawha Trail parallels the Blue Ridge Parkway on Grandfather Mountain in North Carolina.

You will need to bring hiking footwear, water, lunch, and rain gear. All participants on Sierra Club outings are required to sign a standard liability waiver. If you would like to read the liability waiver before you choose to participate in an outing, go to http://www.sierraclub.org/outings/chapter/forms/. Group size will be limited to 15.

For more information please contact Kathy Rigsbee at knrigsbee@gmail.com or (336) 466-2803.

TanawhaTrailMap0044.jpg

November 1 – 3, near Boone, NC

Hump Mountain Overnight Hike and Backpack Trip

Bring your own gear and food or arrange prior to departure to share. Please arrange your own car pools. The AT through this section is reported to be exposed with vistas. The bald on Big Hump provides a vast sweep of the mountains of NC and TN including Roan High Knob, Grandfather Mt and as far away as Mt Rogers on a clear day.

Group size is limited depending on destination and experience of participants. $25 per person is refundable-at-the-trail head, deposit required. For full trip information, visit:  http://nc2.sierraclub.org/outing/hump-mountain.

Want to know the latest? Join us on Facebook or Twitter!

Join us on Facebook NC Chapter on Twitter

VA Line

Did you know you can make a monthly gift to the NC Sierra Club? Find out how you can make a sustaining gift by visiting our website, or contacting the Chapter office at 919-833-8467.

Money Flower Donate Button

* “Nuclear Power in the Carolinas – Wasting Away or a Glowing Threat?” – Oct 23 Meeting

01_High-Level-Waste-Idaho

What’s going on with nuclear power in North Carolina?   Even the former chair of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) says the nuclear industry is dying1 and yet Duke wants to build two nuclear reactors just south of Charlotte in Gaffney2.  After decades of no permanent solution, nuclear fuel is building up in NC3 and most of it is in hazardous spent fuel pools4.  Are the nuclear reactors surrounding Charlotte at risk5 and are we prepared for a nuclear emergency in Charlotte6?  What are the issues?  What can we do about it7?

Join us Wednesday, October 23, to hear “Nuclear Power in the Carolinas – Wasting Away or a Glowing Threat?” with Mary Olson. Mary has been on the staff of Nuclear Information and Resource Service (NIRS) for twenty-two years, serving as staff biologist, radioactive waste specialist and since 1999, the Director of the Southeast Office. As young research assistant Olson suffered a radiation accident; Dr. Helen Caldicott’s book, Nuclear Madness restored her perspective and set her on the path of work to protect others from ionizing radiation. Mary has done so by educating the public, congress, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and now the rising generation of activists.

Our meeting starts off at 6:30 PM with pizza, refreshments and a chance to meet and socialize with other Sierra Club members and friends. The business meeting and program will begin at 7:00 PM. Non-members and potential new members are very welcome!

Central Piedmont Sierra Club meetings are held in the Mahlon Adams Pavilion at Freedom Park, 2435 Cumberland Avenue, Charlotte, NC, 28203. Cumberland Avenue is off of the 1500 block of East Boulevard.

The program is free and open to the public and you do not have to be a member to attend. Free parking is available.

Bring a friend or two; you’ll be glad you did! See you there…

Additional information

1. Former NRC Chairman Says U.S. Nuclear Industry is “Going Away” “This is not a future technology. It’s an old technology, and it serves a useful purpose. But that purpose is running its course.” “The industry is going away,” he said bluntly. “Four reactors are being built, but there’s absolutely no money and no desire to finance more plants than that.

2. Duke Energy continues to support Lee nuke plant That Duke proclaims the continued viability of nuclear in all sorts of forums — from its annual analysts meeting several months ago to a small chamber meeting this week — indicates how seriously Duke takes the need to keep its options open on Lee.

3. N.C. brims with nuclear waste The state ranks fourth in the nation for accumulated nuclear waste.

4. Nuclear Power Safety in North Carolina

5. NC’s 3 Nuclear Plants Report More Than 90 Violations The three nuclear power plants in North Carolina have each reported at least 90 safety violations since 2000. The Government Accountability Office report obtained by The Associated Press shows that the McGuire plant near Charlotte reported 119 lower–level violations and one higher-level violation from 2000 to 2012.

6. In the event of a nuclear accident, is Charlotte ready? Duke Energy hires a consultant to estimate evacuation times for McGuire and Catawba Nuclear Stations. The most recent evacuation time estimates for McGuire predict everyone within a ten-mile radius of the plant could get out within six hours at most. The projection takes into account severe weather and large gatherings at places like Davidson Stadium, the Metorlina Expo and the Renaissance Fair simultaneously. But the report is based on 2004 traffic counts. In a real emergency, the best laid plans would run headlong into real traffic.

7. NRC Nuclear Waste Meeting – Charlotte, Nov 4 Come speak out on this issue!

* NRC Nuclear Waste Meeting – Charlotte, Nov 4

Mark your calendar and plan to attend this critical NRC public hearing!
Please email me, Bill Gupton, if you would like to be on the planning team.
Thanks!

NRC Waste Conf AlertNRC Public Meeting Notice

Monday, November 4

Open House: 6:00-7:00 p.m. EST
Meeting: 7:00-10:00 p.m. EST

Charlotte, North Carolina
Hilton Charlotte University Place
8629 J.M. Keynes Drive
Charlotte, NC  28262

Meeting Notice


To prepare for the meeting and developing written comments see:
What is “Waste Confidence” and what are these hearings about? (attached)
Talking Points for Waste Confidence EIS (attached)

P.S. While you’re thinking about it, take action to stop the nuclear waste shell game!

Stop Temporary Storage of Nuclear Waste

Nuclear Waste should not be moved around the country in the continuing shell game of what to do with it. Nor should we kick the can down the road.

* September Meeting Presentation – Check out the upcoming green events and opportunities!

Thanks to everyone that attended our September monthly meeting! Great to see old faces and bunches of new folks!

Click below to see our programs and events. Email me, Bill, with questions, comments, or to volunteer for an event.

See you next month on October 23.

CPG Meeting Sept 2013

CPSC Meeting 2013 Sept

* Green and Not So Green News for Sept 22 – September Equinox Edition

Happy first day of fall!

This meeting will put a glow in your complexion!
Mark your calendar! Download information. Help with planning, organizing, and turnout!
Radioactive Nuclear Waste Rulemaking Public Meeting
Sierra Club No Nuke Campaign materials for Charlotte meeting

Monday, November 4
Meeting Notice
Charlotte, North Carolina
Hilton Charlotte University Place
8629 J.M. Keynes Drive, Charlotte, NC  28262
Open House – 6:00-7:00 p.m. EST
Meeting – 7:00-10:00 p.m. EST

Background On Waste Confidence – http://content.sierraclub.org/grassrootsnetwork/documents/background-waste-confidence
Talking Points and comment instructions for Waste Confidence Hearings – http://content.sierraclub.org/grassrootsnetwork/documents/talking-points-and-comment-instructions-waste-confidence-hearings

Speaking of Nukes – Here’s a chance to make a statement!
5th Annual Nuclear Construction Summit – 22-23 October 2013, Ritz Carlton, Charlotte, North Carolina
The premium meeting place for the world’s nuclear professionals involved in new construction. With over 400 delegates, the Nuclear Construction Summit will give you the solutions to the biggest challenges facing the industry today.
Understand how nuclear construction is forecast to grow in the coming years and how you can overcome competition from low costing natural gas
Get exclusive updates on the biggest construction projects currently taking place
Learn how licensing procedures have changed and how you can overcome these challenges to ensure project timelines are met
Get the low down on the development of SMRs and updates on when widespread deployment will become a reality

This from the man that brought us Crystal River and Levy nuclear plants
TVA CEO touts promise of small Babcock & Wilcox reactors
CEO Bill Johnson cites the Tennessee Valley Authority’s work with Babcock & Wilcox to install small modular nuclear reactors at its Clinch River Nuclear plant as among TVA’s most exciting energy projects in an interview with Power Engineering magazine.
“I really think if we want to continue to have low-cost power, and deal with the environmental issues, and have a say in nuclear matters around the world, we need to plan on having nuclear as part of our future,” he says.

The Number One Issue of Our Generation
Renowned Scientists Declare Human Activity the Root of Global Warming
With the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report not yet published, there is already heated debate about what it will say, and about the implications of its findings for human development.
The scientists’ statement is unequivocal, and is not based on whatever the IPCC may publish. They say: “The body of evidence indicating that our civilization has already caused significant global warming is overwhelming.”
They say that if humans continue with business as usual, using fossil fuels and pumping out excessive amounts of greenhouse gases, the world will be on track for a planet that is four degrees Celsius warmer by the end of this century, or even earlier.
“Although climate science only tells us what might happen and not what to do about it, we feel that inaction is an unacceptable prospect,” the scientists say.
They write that there is “ample evidence” that the world can hold a two degree Celsius line, and say technology shows that global sustainability is attainable. But they add, “… the evidence demonstrates that the time frame to achieve this is rapidly shrinking.”

A big step to deal with our Number One Issue!
2013 Proposed Carbon Pollution Standard for New Power Plants
On Sept. 20, 2013, the Environmental Protection Agency issued a new proposal for carbon pollution from new power plants. After considering more than 2.5 million comments from the public about the 2012 proposal and consideration of recent trends in the power sector, EPA is changing some aspects of its approach.  EPA is proposing to set separate standards for natural gas-fired turbines and coal-fired units.

    Press release file-application-pdf” id=”file-43327″>Proposed Carbon Pollution Standard for New Power Plants – Sept. 20, 2013 (PDF)(463 pp, 1 MB)
  • EPA Fact Sheet: Reducing Carbon Pollution from Power Plants – Sept. 20, 2013 (PDF)(4 pp, 106 K)
  • EPA Technical Fact Sheet: Reducing Carbon Pollution from Power Plants – Sept. 20, 2013 (PDF)(6 pp, 118 K)
  • Regulatory Impact Analysis: Proposed Standards of Performance for GHG Emissions for New EGUs – Sept. 20, 2013 (PDF)(138 pp, 2 MB)
  • Withdrawal of 2012 Proposed Carbon Pollution Standards for New Power Plants (PDF)(15 pp, 89 K)

Surprise, Surprise, Surprise
Duke Energy knocks new EPA plant regulations
Duke Energy has joined many in the power industry to criticize the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed carbon regulations for new coal and natural gas plants, while environmental groups are generally praising the move. Duke does not plan to build more coal plants after completing the 820-megawatt Cliffside expansion in North Carolina last year and the 620-megawatt Edwardsport plant in Indiana this year. But it says the regulations should not preclude future coal construction.
Duke is also trying to determine what impact the new rule might have on Duke’s plans for construction of new combined-cycle gas plants in the Carolinas and Florida.

A big reason why we have this Number One problem
Top 50 polluters emit 75% of greenhouse gases

  • Fifty of the world’s 500 largest publicly traded companies are responsible for nearly three quarters of the group’s greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new report by a group that compiles data on climate change.
  • The big emitters are not doing enough to reduce emissions, and the top 50 have increased their emissions since 2009, the report says.
  • U.S. companies in the top 50 include oil majors such as Exxon (XOM), Chevron (CVX) and ConocoPhillips (COP), and other giants such as Wal-Mart (WMT), FedEx (FDX), Dow Chemical (DOW), AT&T (T) and Duke Energy (DUK).
  • Exxon, Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B), Sasol (SSL), BP and Petrobras (PBR) are the five biggest emitters in the energy sector.

Kicking some more ash
Federal Clean Water Act Suit for Sutton Plant of Duke Progress at Wlmington, NC
On Sept 12 SELC filed a federal Clean Water Act suit against Duke Progress for CWA and permit violations for coal ash pollution at its Sutton plant in Wilmington, NC.  This is in addition to the state enforcement action, in which SELC has sought to intervene.  The emphasis is on selenium pollution of the Lake and on various pollutants in ground water that is moving toward community drinking water wells and into the Lake.

Don’t hold your breath while reading this
Study: Air Pollution Causes 200,000 Early Deaths Each Year in the US
“Researchers from MIT have come out with some sobering new data on air pollution’s impact on Americans’ health. The group tracked ground-level emissions from sources such as industrial smokestacks, vehicle tailpipes, marine and rail operations, and commercial and residential heating throughout the United States, and found that such air pollution causes about 200,000 early deaths each year. Emissions from road transportation are the most significant contributor, causing 53,000 premature deaths, followed closely by power generation, with 52,000.

New report on NC carbon pollution
NC ranked 12th nationally for power plant C02 emissions News & Observer (blog)
The data issued by Environment North Carolina is based on on 2011 emissions from Duke Energy and Progress Energy coal-burning power plants, as reported …

Final thought
“We are responsible for the condition of the Earth. We are the ones who are responsible and we can change that. If we wake up, it is possible to change the energy. It is possible to change everything.”
— Hunbatz Men, MAYAN

* Green and Not So Green News for Sept 10

Here are some recent articles that you might find interesting. Feel free to share.

$69 Million Down the Drain
Duke Energy Progress says NC customers owe $45M for nuke plant costs

75 Year Old Power Cut Off While in Hospital
Duke Energy cuts power to woman on oxygen pump

And you wonder why their Customer Satisfaction is so low?!
Duke Energy, Tampa Electric at bottom of JD Power survey

Would Duke try to get ratepayers to pick up cost overruns for bad management? You betcha!
Critics: Duke trying to shift more Ind. plant cost

Duke’s Poor Maintenance at S.C. Nuke
NRC confers with Duke Energy on Robinson plant

Speaking of nuclear mismanagement
Duke Energy reaches revised multi-year settlement with Florida consumer advocates

Another major win for Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal campaign!

Duke Energy to retire five coal-fired Indiana plants by 2018

Excellent article about the Asheville Coal Ash dumps
Public opposes coal ash pollution settlement

So why can’t Duke do this in NC?!
Dominion bringing lower cost offshore wind to customers

Dominion subsidiary Dominion Virginia Power has bid $1.6 million to win the lease of 112,800 acres of federal land off the coast of Virginia to develop an offshore wind turbine farm. The wind farm would be capable of generating up to 2,000 MW of electricity.

Conducted by the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), eight companies, including Dominion, were approved to bid, but only two participated. Dominion won in the sixth round.

“Offshore wind has the potential to provide the largest, scalable renewable resource for Virginia if it can be achieved at reasonable cost to customers,” said Mary C. Doswell, senior vice president of Alternative Energy Solutions. “We will now proceed with the BOEM timetable for development of the commercial wind energy area while advancing our research proposal and looking for ways to lower the cost of bringing offshore wind generation to customers.”

BOEM has several milestones that Dominion must meet to keep the lease with the final milestone being the submittal of a Construction and Operations Plan within five years of signing the lease. Once BOEM has the plan, it has an undetermined amount of time to perform an environmental analysis and approve the plan. Dominion expects the first turbine to be installed in about 10 years pending project approval by state regulators.

Dominion and its team was also one of seven projects selected to receive $4 million each in federal matching funds to undertake initial engineering, design, and permitting for a demonstration facility of two 6 MW turbines with a goal of finding innovative ways to lower costs of offshore wind. The Department of Energy will select up to three of the projects for follow-on phases to move forward with the final design, permitting, and ultimate construction of these demonstration projects. These projects must be in operation by the end of 2017.

For more:
– see this article

Related Articles:
Wind lease auction history in the making
Dominion taps Virgina’s offshore winds
Streamlining offshore wind development
Maine home to world’s first grid-connected offshore floating wind turbine

 
Thanks to the NC League of Conservation Voters for these next three updates:
Cooper Proposes Rate Re-Hearing: N.C. Attorney General Roy Cooper last week asked the N.C. Utilities Commission to hold new hearings on the Duke Energy rate hike returned to the Commission for further deliberation by the N.C. Supreme Court. The Court found that the Commission had not adequately considered and ruled on all issues in connection with the rate of return (profit) it allowed Duke in its rate hike. Duke and the Commission’s “Public Staff” (which is supposed to represent the public’s interests) want the Commission to just enter new findings into the record and re-approve the rate hike. Cooper says that’s not good enough.

 

Florida Provides Case Study on Abuse of “CWIP”

CIB last month reported on Duke Energy’s cancellation of a proposed $25 billion new nuclear plant in its recently acquired Florida territory. While the decision to cancel the plant was roundly praised as a wise call, the fact remains that Florida electric ratepayers are getting socked with the costs already spent on studying and designing the canceled plant. Why? Because of an ugly utility financing gimmick called “construction work in progress” or CWIP.

CWIP is a utility financing method allowed in some states–including North Carolina–which permits the regulated power company to pass along to its monopoly public customers the costs of planning and building plants even when they’re never completed or used. Critics of CWIP point out that it reduces the incentive for utilities to exercise caution in proposing expensive new power plants that may never be needed, or which may (like many proposed nuclear plants) turn out to be too expensive to complete, or otherwise too problematic to finish.

In the case of the now-canceled Levy nuclear plant in Florida, the citizen clean energy group Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE) has pointed out how Florida’s CWIP law contributed to the waste of much ratepayer money on an unnecessary and unsuccessful project. SACE criticizes Florida’s equivalent of NC’s Utilities Commission, the Florida Public Service Commission (PSC), for inadequate oversight of spending under the CWIP loophole.

For more discussion of the Levy nuclear waste (wasteful spending) debacle, and its implications to another proposed Florida nuclear plant expansion, see SACE’s article here and its PSC brief here.

In North Carolina, CWIP was allowed with little restraint during the 1970’s and helped fuel expansive and speculative nuclear construction plans. The N.C. General Assembly reined in CWIP in 1982, and that decision helped bring utility construction planning back to earth. Unfortunately, the 2007 legislature loosened the state’s grip on CWIP once again, helping set off a surge of new nuclear proposals. Even with CWIP, however, the economics of new nuclear construction are proving so problematic that the much-vaunted nuclear ‘renaissance’ is backsliding into a new nuclear dark age.

 

Education & Resources: Preview Climate Change Rules

The first regulations aimed at reducing carbon emissions from power plants are due out from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by September 20. In a webcast discussion set for Monday, September 16, at 1:30 p.m., representatives from the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions and Duke Law School will preview the legal, political, environmental and economic implications of the expected rules. The webcast can be watched live on YouTube via this link.