Tell the EPA: Nuclear Power is NOT part of the Climate Solution

We need your voice! The EPA has extended the public comment period on the Clean Power Plan proposed carbon rule through December 1, 2014. The Sierra Club Nuclear Free Campaign strongly supports EPA’s move toward reducing CO2 emissions, but their inclusion of nuclear reactors as a reliable source of electricity is a mistake. Tell EPA to remove all support for nuclear power from its Carbon Rule and instead, strongly promote a speedy transition from fossil fuels and nuclear to renewables and energy efficiency.

Sierra Club Nuclear Free logo

Sierra Club Nuclear Free Campaign

COMMENTS ON THE EPA CARBON RULE

TELL EPA: NUCLEAR POWER IS NOT PART OF THE CLIMATE SOLUTION!

On June 2, 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced its proposed rule for reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from existing electrical generation units. This is an important and historic step toward addressing climate change. But EPA’s support of nuclear power and underplaying of the importance of renewables and efficiency is of serious concern.

☢ The EPA Clean Power Plan Proposed Rule supports building new nuclear reactors (power plants) and maintaining existing reactors as an alternative to burning fossil fuels.

☢ The rule encourages states to prevent even the most uncompetitive nuclear reactors from closing.

☢ The rule underestimates the advantages of renewable energy and energy efficiency as the best alternatives for reducing carbon emissions. The rule should acknowledge that renewables and efficiency can produce the power we need without the use of fossil fuels or nuclear power AND they can remove more carbon per dollar spent in a shorter time. Numerous studies have shown that this transition needs only the political will to make it happen.

☢ New nuclear reactors cost billions of dollars and take many years to bring on line. Renewable energy, and especially energy efficiency, are much cheaper and their development is already underway.

☢ EPA incorrectly claims that nuclear power is reliable. This ignores the many times nuclear reactors had to shut for years due to warm water temperatures, flooding, and extreme weather events, all of which will worsen as the climate warms.

☢ Nuclear power is far from carbon-free. Fossil fuels are used for uranium mining, milling, processing, conversion, enrichment, transportation and construction of reactors. Huge amounts of energy will be needed to isolate nuclear waste for millennia—a task which science has so far not been able to address. Large amounts of water are also used to operate and cool the reactors.

☢ EPA seriously minimizes the problem of radioactive waste. In fact, they erroneously contend that radioactive waste avoids the problem of waste from coal-fired generation! Waste from coal is a serious problem but radioactive waste is extremely dangerous and remains so for millions of years. EPA also ignores the routine radioactive releases at all reactors and the several U.S. close calls to nuclear meltdowns. The Sierra Club maintains that the first step toward dealing with nuclear waste and radioactive pollution is to stop generating it.

☢ The proposed rule improperly calls for reductions in CO2 from 2005 levels. The problem is that CO2 levels in 2005 were the highest ever. In fact, current levels of CO2 are 15% less than in 2005. The proposed rule should at least use current levels, or more appropriately, 1990 levels.

☢ The nuclear industry is looking to gain carbon credits—we say these carbon credits are undeserved, but in any case the industry is asking for carbon credits for nuclear power. These very credits will allow the industry to burn more coal. How does EPA propose that we obtain our national energy supply if we cut carbon but do not strongly emphasize moving as quickly as possible to sustainable, renewable replacement sources such as wind, solar, geothermal and efficiency?

☢ Currently EPA has out an Advanced Notice for comments on Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Nuclear Power Operations. Unless the current Radiation Protection Standards are strengthened, EPA will continue to have lower standards for protection from radioactivity than the standards they have for protection from other pollutants. EPA’s “acceptable” cancer risk range is 1 in a million to 1 in 10,000 for other pollutants. Their allowable limit for radioactive exposure is 25 millirems per year. If a person’s lifespan is 70 years, the risk becomes 1cancer per 500 persons for radioactivity. It is worrisome that EPA does not mention strengthening its standards in its Advanced Notice for Comments, leaving the public to wonder if they are planning to lower their standards even further. So on the one hand, EPA is encouraging economic subsidies to nuclear power, while on the other hand EPA might change standards to allow more radioactive pollution from the nuclear fuel chain.

EPA has extended the public comment period on the Clean Power Plan proposed carbon rule through December 1, 2014. The Sierra Club Nuclear Free Campaign strongly supports EPA’s move toward reducing CO2 emissions, but their inclusion of nuclear reactors as a reliable source of electricity is a mistake. Tell EPA to remove all support for nuclear power from its Carbon Rule and instead, strongly promote a speedy transition from fossil fuels and nuclear to renewables and energy efficiency.

Comments can be made online at http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=EPA-HQ-OAR-2013-0602-0001. Reference Docket ID EPA-HQ-OAR-2013-0602. There is reference in this link that comments are due by October 16. However, the deadline has been extended through Dec. 1, which the top of the right-hand column confirms. Alternatively, fax to 202-566-9744 or mail to EPA Docket Center, Mailcode 28221T, Attn: Docket OAR–2013-0602, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20460.

Sierra Club’s NATIONAL SUMMIT FOR A NUCLEAR FREE FUTURE, NOV. 14-17, 2014, in Washington, DC

Do you have a passion for a carbon free, nuclear free energy future? If so, the Sierra Club’s NATIONAL SUMMIT FOR A NUCLEAR FREE FUTURE, NOV. 14-17, 2014, in Washington, DC will be a great opportunity to become active and shape this movement. Register at Buy Tickets for: National Summit for a Nuclear Free Future

best_SierraClubNuclearFree_logo.png

The EPA is blatantly promoting nuclear power as one solution to cutting carbon. Nuclear is NO solution, and we need to push to end any campaigns to encourage more nuclear, and instead promote clean renewable technologies. Come help us plan strategies to move towards a future free of nuclear power.

Here are the event details:
WHO: Sierra Club Nuclear Free Campaign
WHAT: National Summit for a Nuclear Free Future
WHEN: Nov. 14-17, 2014
WHERE: National 4-H Youth Conference Center, 7100 Connecticut Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815

Questions: Susan Corbett (reindeargirl@gmail.com)

We look forward to seeing you there!

Start Date: Friday, November 14, 2014
End Date:   Monday, November 17, 2014

If you’d like to attend this event you can purchase tickets online.

Click here to RSVP.
Click here to RSVP.

Nat Nuke Summit Nov 2014Nuclear Summit Nov 2014

Why We Must March!

Great article. And in other news…

The People’s Climate March has gone global!

A weekend to bend the course of history

In September, heads of state are going to New York City for a historic summit on climate change. With our future on the line, we will take a weekend and use it to bend the course of history.

In New York City there will be an unprecedented climate mobilisation – in size, beauty, and impact. This moment will not be just about New York or the United States. Heads of state from around the world will be there, as will the attention of global media.

Our demand is for Action, Not Words: take the action necessary to create a world with an economy that works for people and the planet – now. In short, we want a world safe from the ravages of climate change.

We know that no single meeting or summit will “solve climate change” and in many ways this moment will not even really be about the summit. We want this moment to be about us – the people who are standing up in our communities, to organise, to build power, to confront the power of fossil fuels, and to shift power to a just, safe, peaceful world.

To do that, we need to act – together.

Join the Global Weekend of Action

 

People’s Climate March = Marching for the Future

Bill McKibben, Eddie Bautista, LaTonya Crisp-Sauray | September 14, 2014

On Sunday, Sept. 21, a huge crowd will march through the middle of Manhattan. It will almost certainly be the largest rally about climate change in human history, and one of the largest political protests in many years in New York. More than 1,000 groups are coordinating the march—environmental justice groups, faith groups, labor groups—which means there’s no one policy ask. Instead, it’s designed to serve as a loud and pointed reminder to our leaders, gathering that week at the United Nations to discuss global warming, that the next great movement of the planet’s citizens centers on our survival and their pathetic inaction.

As a few of the march’s organizers, though, we can give some sense of why we, at least, are marching, words we think represent many of those who will gather at Columbus Circle for the walk through midtown Manhattan.

PCM Bright Eyes

We’re tired of winning the argument and losing the fight. And so we march. Poster by James Jean

We march because the world has left the Holocene behind: scientists tell us that we’ve already raised the planet’s temperature almost one degree Celsius, and are on track for four or five by century’s end. We march because Hurricane Sandy filled the New York City subway system with salt water, reminding us that even one of the most powerful cities in the world is already vulnerable to slowly rising ocean levels.

We march because we know that climate change affects everyone, but its impacts are not equally felt: those who have contributed the least to causing the crisis are hit hardest, here and around the world. Communities on the frontlines of global warming are already paying a heavy price, in some cases losing the very land on which they live. This isn’t just about polar bears any more.

But since polar bears can’t march, we march for them, too, and for the rest of creation now poised on the verge of what biologists say will be the planet’s sixth great extinction event, one unequalled since the last time a huge asteroid struck the Earth 66 million years ago.

And we march for generations yet to come, our children, grandchildren and their children, whose lives will be systematically impoverished and degraded. It’s the first time one century has wrecked the prospects of the millennia to come, and it makes us mad enough to march.

We march with hope, too. We see a few great examples around the world of how quickly we could make the transition to renewable energy. We know that if there were days this summer when Germany generated nearly 75 percent of its power from renewable sources of energy, the rest of us could, too—especially in poorer nations around the equator that desperately need more energy. And we know that labor-intensive renewables would provide far more jobs than capital-intensive coal, gas and oil.

And we march with some frustration: why haven’t our societies responded to 25 years of dire warnings from scientists? We’re not naïve; we know that the fossil fuel industry is the 1 percent of the 1 percent. But sometimes we think we shouldn’t have to march. If our system worked the way it should, the world would long ago have taken the obvious actions economists and policy gurus have recommended—from taxing carbon to reflect the damage it causes to funding a massive World War II-scale transition to clean energy.

Marching is not all, or even most, of what we do. We advocate; we work to install solar panels; we push for sustainable transit. We know, though, that history shows marching is usually required, that reason rarely prevails on its own. (And we know that sometimes even marching isn’t enough; we’ve been to jail and we’ll likely be back.)

We’re tired of winning the argument and losing the fight. And so we march. We march for the beaches and the barrios. We march for summers when the cool breeze still comes down in the evening. We march because Exxon spends $100 million every day looking for more hydrocarbons, even though scientists tell us we already have far more in our reserves than we can safely burn. We march for those too weak from dengue fever and malaria to make the journey. We march because California has lost 63 trillion gallons of groundwater to the fierce drought that won’t end, and because the glaciers at the roof of Asia are disappearing. We march because researchers told the world in April that the West Antarctic ice sheet has begun to melt “irrevocably”; Greenland’s ice shield may soon follow suit; and the waters from those, as rising seas, will sooner or later drown the world’s coastlines and many of its great cities.

We don’t march because there’s any guarantee it will work. If you were a betting person, perhaps you’d say we have only modest hope of beating the financial might of the oil and gas barons and the governments in their thrall. It’s obviously too late to stop global warming entirely, but not too late to slow it down—and it’s not too late, either, to simply pay witness to what we’re losing, a world of great beauty and complexity and stability that has nurtured humanity for thousands of years.

There’s a world to march for—and a future, too. The only real question is why anyone wouldn’t march.

Eddie Bautista is executive director of the New York City Environmental Justice Alliance. LaTonya Crisp-Sauray is the recording secretary for the Transport Workers Union Local 100. Bill McKibben is the founder of 350.org and a TomDispatch regular.

http://ecowatch.com/2014/09/14/peoples-climate-march-future/

EPA Clean Power Plan Background Information

Check out these Sierra Club resources on the EPA Clean Power Plan. Put this information to use tonight, Sept 9th!

Citizen’s Climate Hearing
September 9th
6:00-8:00 p.m.
Myers Park Baptist Church
Heaton Hall
1900 Queens Rd, Charlotte, NC 28207

Free Solar Tours preceding the hearing – 5:00 and 5:30 PM

Hearing Format
•    Please limit oral comments to 3 minutes (typically 400 – 450 words)
•    Please bring a copy of prepared comments for the court reporter (optional)
•    Written comments may be of any length and submitted without public speaking

New EPA rules on carbon will benefit economy

The Boss Calls Us To “Get Out On The Street” in NYC

New York City!

New York City!

New York City!

Click below, turn up the volume, get psyched, and then Sign Up Now to join a quarter million folks as we March for Climate Change!

LIVE-in-NYC-crop_13418-x8-46_1

When I’m out in the street, girl
Well, I never feel alone
When I’m out in the street, girl
In the crowd I feel at home
The black and whites they cruise by
And they watch us from the corner of their eye

But there ain’t no doubt, girl, down here
We ain’t gonna take what they’re handing out
When I’m out in the street
I walk the way I wanna walk
When I’m out in the street
I talk the way I wanna talk
Baby, out in the street I don’t feel sad or blue
Baby, out in the street I’ll be waiting for you

When your grandchildren ask you, “What did you do in the 2014 Climate Crisis?” You’ll be able to smile and say, “I was there. I was out in the street…..

Sign Up Now!

New York City!

2nd Charlotte Bus to New York City – Limited Seats, Sign Up Today!

I’m pleased to announce that we have secured funding for a second bus from Charlotte to New York City for the Sept 21 People’s Climate March!!!!! This brings the number of confirmed PCM North Carolina buses to 7!

There are a limited numbers of seats and we expect the bus to fill up fast. Reserve your seat at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/charlotte-bus-to-nyc-peoples-climate-march-2nd-bus-tickets-12941459253.

 

Charlotte to New York City for the People’s Climate March – 2nd Bus

Tentative Timetable
Exact times and locations are being finalized and will be announced shortly.

Saturday, Sept 20 – Location TBD. Sign in at 7:30 PM. Bus pulls out at 8:00 PM sharp!

Sunday, Sept 21 – Stop along New Jersey Turnpike for breakfast. Drop off in NYC at 9:00 AM.
Participate in March (11:30 – 3:30, approximate times). Pick up in same location (Time TBD).

Monday, Sept 22 – Arrive Charlotte approximately 4:00 AM (same location)

Cost (Round trip)
General ticket – $25 + $2.37 Eventbrite fee

Register Today – Only 55 total seats available!
Please register by Monday, Sept 8th, to assure your seat!

Yes!, I want to Get On The Bus

For more information contact: Bill Gupton at wmgupton@aol.com

2nd Charlotte Bus Flyer2nd Bus PCM Charlotte to NYC

People’s Climate March – No Nukes Resources

Check out the People’s Climate March: No Nukes Resources! Thanks to NIRS for this great information.

Sierra Club Nuclear Free logo

climateflyer614

The following information was developed by Nuclear Information and Resource Service (NIRS). Great work folks!

Resources and Materials:

Postcard Flyer. Side one: pdf version. jpg version. doc version. Side two: pdf version. jpg version. doc version. Both sides in one file: pdf version. jpg version. doc version.

Flyer: Why We March. pdf version. jpg version.

Flyer: 350.org’s Bill McKibben on why nuclear power won’t be a climate solution. pdf version. jpg version.

Flyer: Talking Points on nuclear power in EPA’s proposed carbon reduction rule. pdf version. jpg version.

Fact sheet: Nuclear Power and Climate: Why Nukes Can’t Save the Planet.

EPA’s proposed carbon rules provide subsidies to uneconomic, aging, dangerous nuclear reactors. NIRS press release.

Flyers: Why Nukes Can’t Save the Climate:

Reason #1. Too Many Reactors, Not Enough Carbon Reductions pdf version (best for downloading and printing). jpg version (best for posting online). Word version (take out NIRS contact info and add your group’s info).

Reason #2. Nuclear power costs too much. pdf version (best for downloading and printing). jpg version (best for posting online). Word version (take out NIRS contact info and add your group’s info).

Reason #3. Nuclear Power would take too long. pdf version (best for downloading and printing). jpg version (best for posting online). Word version (take out NIRS contact info and add your group’s info).

Reason #4. New Reactor Designs: Too Slow, No Demand. pdf version (best for downloading and printing). jpg version (best for posting online). Word version (take out NIRS contact info and add your group’s info).

Reason #5. Too Much Radioactive Waste. pdf version (best for downloading and printing). jpg version (best for posting online). Word version (take out NIRS contact info and add your group’s info).

Reason #6. Too Little Safety. pdf version (best for downloading and printing). jpg version (best for posting online). Word version (take out NIRS contact info and add your group’s info).

Reason #7. Too Many Nuclear Weapons. pdf version (best for downloading and printing). jpg version (best for posting online). Word version (take out NIRS contact info and add your group’s info).

Background Reading

Briefing Paper: Nuclear Energy is Dirty Energy (and does not fit in a clean energy standard). Revised and updated, July 2014. pdf

Nuclear-Free, Carbon-Free: Links to studies showing different pathways to a nuclear-free, carbon-free energy system by mid-century–if not sooner.

We’re going all out for the People’s Climate March. NIRS’ Michael Mariotte on DailyKos, August 22, 2014.

If not nuclear power, what? NIRS’ Michael Mariotte on DailyKos, June 27, 2012.

Top 10 Reasons Nuclear Power Won’t Save the Climate. NIRS’ Michael Mariotte on DailyKos, August 18, 2009 (and still valid).