Duke Energy/Dominion Pipeline – N.C. Public Meetings, VA/WV Local Government and Community Reactions

In this update:

  • N.C. and all 8 Counties – Pipeline maps to download!
  • 5 Public Meetings on N.C. pipeline for landowners and concerned citizens – Sept 22, 23, 25
  • Copy of Nelson County Board of Supervisors resolution opposing pipeline
  • 3 Local VA governments move against pipeline (TV coverage)
  • Local groups forming to oppose pipeline
  • Duke Energy will be the largest customer on proposed pipeline

If you missed the other updates, check them out at Opposition Growing in Virgina Over Atlantic Coast Pipeline (Sept 12, 2014), Update on Duke Energy/Dominion Fracking Gas Pipeline (Sept 10, 2014) and  “Fracking boom prompts $5B Dominion gas pipeline” (Sept 7, 2014).

Maps of proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline – NC and all 8 Counties

ACP NC and County MapsAPC-NC-Map-and-Counties

5 Public Meetings on N.C. pipeline for landowners and concerned citizens – Sept 22, 23, 25

Pipeline Public Meetings

“The Nelson County Board of Supervisors hereby firmly opposes the construction and operation of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline.”

Nelson County Pipeline Resolution

More opposition forms in Va. over gas pipeline to N.C.

John Downey. Sept 12, 2014
Local newspapers and television stations in western Virginia report that over the past several days, three local government boards have passed resolutions concerning the 550-mile Atlantic Coast Pipeline, which starts across the state line in Harris County, W.Va. Two opposed the project outright.
WHSV-TV in Harrisonburg reports the seven-member Staunton City Council on Thursday unanimously passed a resolution against the pipeline (see video below). And the News & Advance of Lynchburg reports that a day earlier, a narrowly divided Nelson County Board of Supervisors passed a similar resolution on a 3-2 vote.
Read the full article at http://www.bizjournals.com/charlotte/blog/energy/2014/09/more-opposition-forms-in-va-over-gas-pipeline-to-n.html.

Staunton Vote Against Pipeline

Hundreds turn out to hear Nelson supes grill Dominion on pipeline

Nelson 100sThere was standing room only in the 650-seat auditorium at Nelson Middle School Tuesday night as residents gathered to hear county officials talk to Dominion reps about the company’s proposed natural gas pipeline. Photo: Graelyn Brashear

Local groups forming to oppose pipeline

Friends of Nelsonhttps://www.facebook.com/No.Nelson.Pipeline

WV Lovershttps://www.facebook.com/wvwildernesslovers.vs.proposed.pipeline

Protesters Rally Against Dominion Pipeline
Protesters Rally Against Dominion Pipeline
Photo by WINA

Duke Energy will be the largest customer on proposed pipeline
Duke Energy and Piedmont Natural Gas want state regulatory approval by Nov. 1 for them to make contracts with the new pipeline.
Sept 9, 2014
John Downey

Duke Energy’s two Carolina utilities will contract for nearly half of the natural gas to be transported daily on the proposed $5 billion Atlantic Coast Pipeline, according to new filings with regulators.

Duke will be the single largest customer on the pipeline, taking gas for use at three plants in eastern North Carolina.

The pipeline is a joint venture of the commercial operations of Duke, Piedmont Natural Gas and Dominion Resources of Virginia as well as AGL Resources of Atlanta. It will be built and operated by Dominion’s commercial subsidiary. Dominion will own 45 percent of the venture, Duke 40 percent, Piedmont 10 percent and AGL 5 percent.

Duke and Piedmont filed requests with the N.C. Utilities Commission and the S.C. Public Service Commission on Monday. They are requesting permission for their Carolinas’ utility operations to make contracts with ACP because the unregulated commercial subsidiaries of Duke and Piedmont will own stakes in the pipeline. Contracts between regulated and unregulated subsidiaries of the two energy companies must be approved by state regulators.

FERC filing

Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress and Piedmont’s utility all ask the commissions to act by Nov. 1. They say any delay could slow applications that must be made for other regulatory approvals. Quick action is necessary, they say, to keep construction on a pace for the pipeline to begin operating Nov. 1, 2018, as proposed.

Those other approvals include a key proceeding with the Federal Energy Regulator Commission, which the companies have said they hope to make a prefiling for later this fall.

It appears the companies want authority to make contracts with ACP before submitting that application, but a spokesman declined to comment further on the reasons action is needed by Nov. 1.

Duke will contract for a maximum of 725 million cubic feet of natural gas from the pipeline daily, more than 48 percent of the pipeline’s capacity. Piedmont will contract for up to 160 million cubic feet per day. PSNC Energy, based in Gastonia, will contract for up to 100 million cubic feet per day.

Dominion and AGL will contract for most of the remainder, though additional customers are being sought for a small amount of capacity that remains on the pipeline.

http://www.bizjournals.com/charlotte/blog/morning-edition/2014/09/duke-energy-will-be-the-largest-customer-on.html

Take 2 Actions: Money Out of Politics / Protect the Arctic From an Oil Spill

Why not take 2 actions to get Money Out of Politics and Protect the Arctic from an oil spill? Click below to speak out!

Take Action: Get Big Money Out of Politics

Take Action: Get Big Money Out of Politics

Our government should respond to the voice of the people, not a few super-rich donors. When big polluters and their unlimited SuperPAC money speaks, they drown out the voices of the people who suffer because of dirty air, contaminated water, and a warming, unstable climate. Right now a critical debate is happening in Washington to help restore our democracy and get big money out of politics. Environmental champion Senator Tom Udall introduced a bill that would give Congress and state legislatures the ability to regulate money in politics. Because of our grassroots pressure over past two months, the bill now has 50 cosponsors, but we need them all to vote yes this week.

Take Action
Tell your senators to vote for the Democracy for All Amendment.

Take Action: Protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge From an Oil Spill

 

Take Action: Protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge From an Oil Spill

The Obama administration has proposed opening oil and gas drilling in the Beaufort Sea — threatening half of America’s polar bear habitat and the pristine Arctic National Wildlife Refuge — home to millions of wild birds and animals. An oil spill in the Beaufort Sea could devastate the coastline of the refuge blanketing it with a thick layer of toxic sludge for decades!

Send the administration a message opposing gas and oil drilling in the Beaufort Sea before the September 12 comment deadline and protect the Arctic!

Take Action
Send the administration a message opposing gas and oil drilling in the Beaufort Sea before the September 12 comment deadline and protect the Arctic!

Opposition Growing in Virginia Over Atlantic Coast Pipeline

This update on the Atlantic Coast pipeline includes:

  • Sierra Club Press Release
  • UVA scientist warns of dire environmental impacts if the proposed natural gas pipeline goes through Highland County
  • SELC Press Statement on Governor McAuliffe’s Announcement on Natural Gas Pipeline
  • Proposal for N.C. natural gas pipeline spawns concerns, environmental coalition
  • Coalition Forms Over Proposed Dominion Pipeline

For additional information, see the previous posts Update on Duke Energy/Dominion Fracking Gas Pipeline (Sept 10, 2014) and  “Fracking boom prompts $5B Dominion gas pipeline” (Sept 7, 2014)

No Pipeline Rally

Sierra Club Press Release:

The Piedmont Group of the Sierra Club is joining forces with the Friends of Nelson, the Augusta County Alliance and 350.org Central Virginia in opposition to the proposed Atlantic Coast pipeline.

Dominion Resources plans to partner with Duke Energy, Piedmont Natural Gas and AGL Resources on the 550-mile Atlantic Coast Pipeline that will stretch from Harrison County, West Virginia to Robeson County, N.C. The pipeline got the blessing of Democratic Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe last Tuesday.

The proposed project would be “a game changer” for Virginia industry and homeowners, Gov. Terry McAuliffe said last Tuesday at an announcement in the Capitol. “It will spur economic growth in all parts of the Commonwealth.”

Environmental and citizen-led community organizations in central and western Virginia have expressed strong opposition to the pipeline project. Major issues concerning the pipeline include property rights violations, property devaluation, impacts to tourism and agricultural-based economies of Nelson and Augusta Counties, public safety and environmental damage along the path of the pipeline to include contamination of local water supplies. Dominion alleges the legal right of entry to private property to survey for right-of-way easements as legislated by the General Assembly in 2004. Significant environmental damage could occur as a result of construction of the pipeline in karst topography, over mountainous terrain and through sensitive environmental areas including the George Washington and Monongahela National Forests, the Blue Ridge Parkway and the Appalachian Trail.

The Augusta County Alliance, formed in July to oppose the pipeline and preserve the rural character of the County, has rallied hundreds of citizens who are united in opposition to the project. “We have been making a very strong case that construction of a huge, 42-inch transmission pipeline through Augusta County will actually harm our rural economic sectors due to the destructive impact on farms, forests and private and public lands, while also creating serious safety concerns, and endangering our water that supplies most of the state,” said Nancy Sorrells, co-chair of the Alliance. Augusta County is slated for 43 miles of the proposed pipeline.

The project has already drawn strong opposition in Nelson County, where about 35 miles of the pipeline would run. Homes and businesses along state Route 151 and 29 sport blue placards that say, “No pipeline.” Thirteen landowners have filed lawsuits against Dominion for violating state law regarding survey of their property. Only twenty-five percent of the affected landowners in Nelson County have agreed to the survey of their property. Opposition has been so strong that surveying in the County has been put on hold several times. “We are very discouraged by the Governor’s support of this pipeline,” said Charlotte Rea, President of Friends of Nelson. “This pipeline will bring no economic gains or permanent jobs to Nelson County but will threaten our water supplies, devalue our property, endanger public safety and deface the landscapes and mountain vistas that are beloved by Nelson County residents and tourists alike and which are the lifeblood of our economy.”

The Piedmont Group of the Sierra Club strongly opposes the proposed Dominion pipeline. “The pipeline would incentivize more fracking across the region, continue to promote the use of fossil fuels and contribute significantly to environmental damage during construction,” said Kirk Bowers, Conservation Chair of the Piedmont Group. “We intend to fight the pipeline. Future generations depend on the outcome of our resolve.”

From: Environmental Groups Join Forces to Oppose Pipeline

 

UVA scientist warns of dire environmental impacts if the proposed natural gas pipeline goes through Highland County

August 25, 2014
Heather Niday

At their meeting on August 19th, Highlanders for Responsible Development [HRD] chairman Lewis Freeman said their group had yet to take a formal position on the Dominion Resources Southeast Reliability Project, a natural gas pipeline that would run through parts of West Virginia and Virginia, including Highland County.  Rick Webb, a member on the board of directors for HRD, a Highland County resident, and a senior scientist at the University of Virginia, has taken a formal position on the pipeline, one that is firmly in opposition.

Webb sees the pipeline putting the natural resources of the county in peril. Referring to a map of the proposed pipeline, Webb told the large crowd gathered at the Highland center that it would cross a considerable amount of sensitive habitat including sections of the George Washington national forest and Virginia wildlife management areas.   Webb showed pictures of a 42” natural gas pipeline under construction in Nebraska, saying a 42 foot wide trench was excavated to allow for construction of the pipeline.  Dominion is proposing to use a 42” pipeline in Pocahontas and Highland counties.  Webb said the trench needed for construction could be even wider than that used in Nebraska.  He said there may be no precedent for construction of such a large pipeline in steep terrain like that found in the Allegheny highlands.

42  inch pipeline under construction in Nebraska -  picture courtesy of Rick Webb

42 inch pipeline under construction in Nebraska – picture courtesy of Rick Webb

The pipeline path would cross eight Highland County mountain ridges at elevations of 3000 to 4200 feet:  Tamarack Ridge, Red Oak Knob, Lantz Mountain, Monterey Mountain, Jack Mountain, Doe Hill, Bullpasture Mountain and Shenandoah Mountain.  It’s not just the view shed that concerns Webb; he fears the resulting forest fragmentation caused by the construction of the pipeline could have adverse impacts on the flora and fauna of the region, including the loss of dependent species, the introduction of invasive species and the loss of habitat for sensitive species such as the Indiana bat and the Cow Knob salamander.

Webb said the Indiana bat, on the endangered species list, is known to inhabit a number of caves within 50 miles of the pipeline path.  Dominion may be required to get an Incidental Take Permit prior to construction.  The Cow Knob salamander is protected under a forest service conservation agreement  and has been observed in several areas close to the pipeline route.  Webb said the pipeline would also cross most of the major streams in the county, many of which also provide native brook trout habitat.

Of special concern to Webb is the Laurel Fork watershed, describing it as one of the most highly valued wild areas in Virginia and the state’s only example of an Alleghenian ecosystem with a multitude of known state rare species.

Karst terrain is another concern according to Webb, saying 50% of the county is underlain by the porous rock formations.   A large number of sinkholes have been mapped across the county, some in the vicinity of the pipeline route.  Dominion has proposed to monitor springs and wells within 200 feet of the pipeline, but Webb say that’s not sufficient given this kind of terrain.

Webb claims that what sets the proposal apart from other alternatives is that the route would cross 50 miles of national forest land and other areas set aside for conservation, would cross much of the best remaining wild landscape in the state, would affect multiple high quality streams and karst hydrology and could have adverse impacts on protected species.  In weighing all that he urges his fellow Highlanders to oppose the pipeline project.

Selected links to information on natural gas pipelines – courtesy of Highlanders for Responsible Development

Interstate natural gas pipeline on my land – what do I need to know?  Published by Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

www.ferc.gov/for-citizens/citizen-guides/citz-guide-gas.pdf

Dominion Resources link on the Southern Reliability Project

www.dom.com/business/gas-transmission/southeast-reliability-project/index.jsp

Virginia statute to permit natural gas companies to enter private property

http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+56-49.01

Gas transmission lines Q & A

www.forensic-appraisal.com/gas_pipelines­_q_a

Natural gas pipelines – a 2011 assessment by the Nature Conservancy, Pennsylvania Chapter of the impact of a new pipeline built in Bradford County, PA

www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/pennsylvania/ng-pipelines.pdf

Gas pipeline boom fragmenting Pennsylvania’s forests

www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-12-10/gas-pipeline-boom-fragmenting-pennsylvania-s-forests.html

A pipeline threatens our family land

www.nytimes.com/2014/07/13/opinion/sunday/a-pipeline-threatens-our-family-land.html?module=Search&mabReward=relbias%3Ar%2C{%221%22%3A%22RI%3A11%22}&_r=0

 

Press Statement on Governor McAuliffe’s Announcement on Natural Gas Pipeline

Charlottesville, VA – The following is a statement from Greg Buppert, senior attorney at the Southern Environmental Law Center:

We are disappointed that the Governor pledged his support today for a major gas pipeline through Virginia’s forests, particularly in light of the potential impacts on the beloved George Washington National Forest, also known as the GW. Dominion’s proposed pipeline would traverse the Allegheny and Blue Ridge mountains through three counties (Highland, Augusta, and Nelson), as well as the Shenandoah Valley. It crosses prime recreational and biological and recreational areas in the national forest, including much of the best remaining wild landscape in Virginia. It is also proposed through one of Virginia’s most rugged landscapes, crossing numerous ridgelines over 3000 feet and raising serious questions about whether it can be built without significant damage to pristine forests and rivers.

Given these potential impacts, the project has generated a chorus of citizen opposition throughout the state. Dominion has not publically identified a customer in Highland, Nelson, and Augusta counties for the gas carried by the pipeline, and the project threatens the integrity of the region’s public lands and communities with few, if any, apparent long-term economic benefits.

In the past, Governor McAuliffe has voiced strong support for protecting the GW from other industrial development in the form of shale gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing. In light of the expected damaging impacts of the proposed pipeline, we urge the Governor will keep his pledge to the citizens of the Commonwealth to protect the GW, a treasured natural resource that hosts more than a million visitors annually and anchors a vital, agriculture and tourism-based economy for the Shenandoah Valley and surrounding communities.

https://www.southernenvironment.org/news-and-press/press-releases/press-statement-on-governor-mcauliffes-announcement-on-natural-gas-pipeline-1

 

Proposal for N.C. natural gas pipeline spawns concerns, environmental coalition
September 9, 2014
A staff and wire report

RICHMOND, Va.- Citing grave concerns, 22 conservation and environmental groups in Virginia and West Virginia are teaming up following the announcement of a proposed $5 billion natural gas pipeline that would end in Robeson County.

Allegheny-Blue Ridge Alliance members are fearful the path of the 550-mile energy project will trample on some of the most ecologically sensitive areas in the Eastern United States. The coalition has not taken a stand on the pipeline.The project was announced last week by Virginia’s Dominion Resources, Duke Energy and other partners. The pipeline would connect the Southeast with rich supplies of natural gas being produced in Ohio, West Virginia and Pennsylvania.

The Atlantic Coast Pipeline would begin Harrison County, West Virginia, and stretch through Virginia and North Carolina.

In North Carolina, the pipeline would wind through parts of Halifax, Nash, Wilson, Johnston, Sampson and Cumberland counties before ending in Robeson County. It will run mostly underground and will be designed to transport 1.5 billion cubic feet of natural gas on a daily basis.

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory said last week that the proposed line “will bring hundreds of jobs and hundreds of millions of dollars of economic activity” to the state.

The project is expected to create nearly 740 jobs annually in North Carolina during the construction phase, according to the Governor’s Office. The economic impact for the state would be $680million, McCrory said.

A total of 52 permanent jobs statewide will be created after construction is complete, the Governor’s Office said.

Before work can begin, state and federal regulators must approve the project. If approved, the pipeline could be in service by late 2018.

http://www.fayobserver.com/news/local/proposal-for-n-c-natural-gas-pipeline-spawns-concerns-environmental/article_3b04e692-0575-512a-b2bd-5da7d75d0340.html

 

Coalition Forms Over Proposed Dominion Pipeline
September 8, 2014

A coalition of 22 organizations from across Virginia and West Virginia has formed the Allegheny-Blue Ridge Alliance in response to the September 2 announcement of the proposed 550-mile natural gas pipeline from Harrison County, WV, to Robeson County, NC. Dubbed the “Atlantic Coast Pipeline” by its proponents, the project is a joint venture of Dominion Resources, Duke Energy, Piedmont Natural Gas and AGL Resources.  The companies have not yet applied for a permit from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.  Contrary to recent suggestions, construction of the project is not a certainty.

The Alliance and its member organizations are gravely concerned about the proposed route of the pipeline, which could disrupt some of the most ecologically sensitive areas in the Eastern United States, including more than 50 miles of public lands in the George Washington and Monongahela national forests.  Further, much of the pipeline’s path, particularly in Highland and Augusta Counties in Virginia, would be built over fragile karst topography, a landscape formed from the dissolution of soluble rocks and characterized by underground drainage systems with sinkholes and caves.  The impact on area water supplies of a pipeline built over such unstable geological formations could be significant.  It could also present serious safety hazards to the pipeline.

Alliance members are also acutely concerned that the proposed project presents substantial unjustified risks and costs for the rural communities of the Allegheny-Blue Ridge region. These communities will bear the full impact of pipeline development, including the loss of private property, damage to their scenic landscape, and the risk of pollution, with few, if any, of the long-term economic benefits touted by proponents.

Founding members of the Allegheny-Blue Ridge Alliance are:

Allegheny Highlands Alliance

Augusta County Alliance

Conservation Partners

Cooper Conservation Advisors, LLC

Cowpasture River Preservation Association

Friends of Blackwater

Friends of Nelson County

Friends of Shenandoah Mountain

Friends of the Middle River

Greenbrier River Watershed Association

Highlanders for Responsible Development

Jackson River Preservation Association

Shenandoah Group of the Sierra Club

Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation

Shenandoah Valley Network

Southern Environmental Law Center

Valley Conservation Council

Virginia Wilderness Committee

West Virginia Environmental Council

West Virginia Highlands Conservancy

West Virginia Rivers Coalition

Wild Virginia

https://www.southernenvironment.org/news-and-press/press-releases/coalition-forms-over-proposed-dominion-pipeline

Update on Duke Energy/Dominion Fracking Gas Pipeline

Include in this update:

  • “Dominion pipeline would have devastating consequences” from Shenandoah Group, Virginia Chapter of the Sierra Club
  • Sierra Club Virgina Chapter reaction to the announcement
  • Information that the WV Sierra Club Chapter has provided to their members
  • Information from Dominion website (to be taken with a couple grains of salt), including sate and county pipeline maps

 

Below are some reactions from the Virgina and West Virgina Sierra Club Chapters about the proposed Duke Energy/Dominion Pipeline.

You should also check out the public information about the pipeline from the Dominion website (see below).

If you missed our first post and/or want more information see “Fracking boom prompts $5B Dominion gas pipeline”

Dominion pipeline would have devastating consequences
June 9, 2014

Although Dominion Virginia Power has kept details about the “Southeast Reliability Project,” a natural gas pipeline that would cross Highland and Augusta counties en route to North Carolina, vague, it is clear the construction and maintenance of such large-scale pipeline would have devastating consequences.

Among the many reasons the Sierra Club in Virginia opposes the project are:

The pipeline will cross nearly 50 miles of hardwood forests of the Monongahela and George Washington National Forests, threatening wildlife, water quality, and recreation. If the pipeline is built, gas producers will argue that drilling wells in the GWNF makes sense given the proximity of a pipeline. New wells and fracking will endanger the unique qualities of this magnificent Appalachian forest and further threaten clean water resources in the mid-Atlantic region.

The pipeline would cross and blight the Blue Ridge Parkway and the Appalachian Trail, two of Virginia’s great natural attractions. It will cross a portion of the McDowell Battlefield and other historically significant sites in the Commonwealth.

The pipeline would not be totally underground. There would be cuts and disturbance of the natural environment. Warning signs, valves, crossings, service roads, and compressor stations would scar the landscape.

In Highland and Augusta counties, the pipeline would cross dozens of streams and rivers including the Bullpasture, the Cowpasture, and the headwaters of the Middle and South rivers. In Virginia, the trunkline and laterals would cross an astonishing 448 waterways. Every cut promises increased erosion, sediment and potential pollution.

Our farmlands, forests, and conservation easements will be marked forever. Passing through the karst limestone of western Virginia, the pipeline may fall victim to sink holes or natural caves that could cause leaks or a catastrophic failure.

More reliance on natural gas will increase greenhouse gas pollution from Virginia power plants. It appears Dominion expects to export much of this gas thereby increasing greenhouse gas emissions abroad.

We are adamantly opposed to Dominion’s proposed pipeline because it threatens our environment, the region’s natural and cultural history, and our way of life that cannot be mitigated by slight changes to the route.

TOM LONG

Mount Solon

The writer is pipeline issues chair of Shenandoah Group, Virginia Chapter of the Sierra Club.

http://www.newsleader.com/story/opinion/readers/2014/06/09/dominion-pipeline-devastating-consequences/10240141/

 

Sierra Club Virgina Chapter reaction to the announcement

Glen Besa, Virginia director of the Sierra Club: “It is most disheartening that the very first major energy announcement coming from the McAuliffe administration is in support of Dominion’s natural gas pipeline to facilitate expanded fracking. There are far more opportunities to create jobs and address climate change in Virginia through investments in energy efficiency, solar power and offshore wind.”
and
The Sierra Club warned the pipeline could open the door to fracking: “It is most disheartening that the very first major energy announcement coming from the McAuliffe Administration is in support of Dominion’s natural gas pipeline to facilitate expanded fracking,” said Glen Besa, Virginia Director of the Sierra Club.

Information that the WV Sierra Club Chapter has provided to their members

WV Chapter Know Your RightsWV Newsletter 2014 4 jul-aug Surveyors

Additional information from Dominion website (to be taken with a couple grains of salt):

Landowner Participation

Dominion has notified landowners along a 400-foot wide study corridor. Preliminary survey work and route planning have been under way since May and could be completed by year-end.

Dominion is progressing toward a final recommended route, thanks to the nearly 70 percent of affected landowners who have given us permission to survey.

Crews are surveying and obtaining information from affected landowners along the way to determine the best route with least impacts to the environment, historic and cultural resources.

Proposed Routes

View proposed route maps below:

Complete Route | West Virginia | Virginia | North Carolina

North Carolina Counties

Cumberland
Halifax
Johnston
Nash
Northampton
Robeson
Sampson
Wilson

Outreach and Schedule

Dominion began meetings in early August and has additional meetings with county boards of commissioners and supervisors of the affected counties in all three states to provide a project update.

Open houses along the route are scheduled for the weeks of Sept. 15 and Sept. 22 to provide government officials, landowners and the general public opportunities to view the latest maps, talk with Dominion representatives and ask questions. (> View a list of open houses.)

Additional open houses and other meetings will be held throughout the process, allowing all parties the chance to better understand the project.

Resources and FAQs

https://www.dom.com/business/gas-transmission/atlantic-coast-pipeline/index.jsp

City of Charlotte Throwing $1000s Away

The City of Charlotte is wasting thousands of taxpayer dollars by the lack of policies and programs to conserve energy across our community.

The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy has issued a report for Charlotte’s Energy Efficiency programs and it’s bad. Really bad!!

Charlotte scored 23.75 points out of a possible 100 points.

Charlotte ranked 31st out of 34 major metropolitan cites.

We hope that Charlotte elected officials and staff will review this report and decided to get serious about energy efficiency. Click below to see how we did in each of 5 areas. Let your elected City officials and staff know that we want to save energy, save money, and save the environment.

Energy Efficiency is ‘Cheapest Fuel’

ACEEE-Energy-Manage1http://www.energymanagertoday.com/energy-efficiency-is-cheapest-fuel-099803/

City of Charlotte Total Score – 23.75 out of 100

Charlotte City Scorecard Rank – 31 out of 34 major metropolitan areas

Charlotte EE Ranking

LCO EE

CWE EE

BP EE

EWU EE

T EE

Read the full report at: http://database.aceee.org/city/charlotte-nc#sthash.2vwIyHiv.dpuf

EPA Clean Power Plan Background Information

Check out these Sierra Club resources on the EPA Clean Power Plan. Put this information to use tonight, Sept 9th!

Citizen’s Climate Hearing
September 9th
6:00-8:00 p.m.
Myers Park Baptist Church
Heaton Hall
1900 Queens Rd, Charlotte, NC 28207

Free Solar Tours preceding the hearing – 5:00 and 5:30 PM

Hearing Format
•    Please limit oral comments to 3 minutes (typically 400 – 450 words)
•    Please bring a copy of prepared comments for the court reporter (optional)
•    Written comments may be of any length and submitted without public speaking

New EPA rules on carbon will benefit economy

Time for the fracking industry to come clean

Sierra Club - Explore, enjoy and protect the planet

Friends,

Tell EPA that the oil and gas industry must disclose the chemicals used in fracking.

Send your letter.

Send your letter

Some recipes are worth sharing, especially when the natural gas industry’s secret fracking chemical cocktail jeopardizes the health of communities across the country.

The EPA has the chance to hold the oil and gas industry accountable by doing two big things — requiring companies to disclose the chemicals used in fracking and requiring studies into how these chemicals impact public health. Since the oil and gas industry is fighting any effort to regulate fracking, it is critical that the EPA hears loud and clear that we have a right to know what chemicals are pumped into fracked wells.

Send your letter today. Tell the EPA that the oil and gas industry must disclose all chemicals used in the fracking process.

Knowing which chemicals are poisoning our air and water is a crucial step to reining in this dangerous industry. Complete disclosure gives activists like you, medical professionals and researchers the power to understand the full scope of health impacts from fracking and potentially trace the pollution back to the polluter.

Tell EPA to hold the oil and gas industry accountable and put the interests of our communities and public health first. With your help, we can send 20,000 letters by Tuesday.

Thanks for all that you do,

Deb Nardone
Director, Dirty Fuels Initiative
Sierra Club

P.S. Six letters are even better than one. Please share this with five of your friends and family.

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