Oct 16 More Moral Movies – Watch and Discuss “Disruption”

This is a powerful film that I highly recommend that you see! Join Action NC, Move to Amend, Greenpeace and the Sierra Club for a moving and inspiring evening!

Disruption Poster

Thursday, October 16

7:00pm

Unitarian Universalist Church of Charlotte
234 N Sharon Amity Rd
Charlotte, North Carolina 28211

Synopsis

‘When it comes to climate change, why do we do so little when we know so much?’

Through a relentless investigation to find the answer, Disruption takes an unflinching look at the devastating consequences of our inaction.

The exploration lays bare the terrifying science, the shattered political process, the unrelenting industry special interests and the civic stasis that have brought us to this social, moral and ecological crossroads.The film also takes us behind-the-scenes of the efforts to organize the largest climate rally in the history of the planet during the UN world climate summit.

This is the story of our unique moment in history. We are living through an age of tipping points and rapid social and planetary change. We’re the first generation to feel the impacts of climate disruption, and the last generation that can do something about it. The film enlarges the issue beyond climate impacts and makes a compelling call for bold action that is strong enough to tip the balance to build a clean energy future.

If a Tar-Sands Project Fails in the Forest…

Coming Clean: The blog of Sierra Club Executive Director Michael Brune

Michael Brune

Oct 1, 2014

Back in March, I wrote about the Keystone XL “it’s not about the pipe,” saying that any rejection of new tar-sands pipelines serves the purpose of keeping this dirty oil in the ground. Some good news from last week proves the point that I and others have been making. The Norwegian energy firm Statoil announced that it would pull the plug on a planned multibillion-dollar, 40,000 barrel per day destructive tar-sands project in Alberta. What reason did they give? Rising costs and “limited pipeline access which weighs on prices for Alberta oil, squeezing margins and making it difficult for sustainable financial returns.” (Translation: We are kicking Keystone’s keister.)

In fact, Statoil’s is actually the third Canadian tar-sands cancellation this year. This latest one, though, is both the largest and the first in-situ project to get the axe. The other two were strip-mining operations, which carry a higher overhead. If you can’t make the numbers work for an in-situ tar-sands mine, then your business model is in trouble.

And if Statoil’s project is in trouble, you can bet the whole tar-sands industry is looking over its shoulder. They may wish they hadn’t, because we’re gaining on them.

Unless you’ve watched tar-sands mining firsthand (an experience I wouldn’t wish on anyone but a couple of Wichita billionaires), it’s impossible to comprehend how nightmarish it really is. (Last week’s “In Focus” photo feature from The Atlantic comes close, though). No rational reason exists for doing this to our planet — unless you count greed. Sadly, some people do. But even if you are willing to destroy 50,000 square miles of boreal forest just to make a profit, there’s no way to justify destroying our future in the process.

No one knows exactly how much oil lies under Alberta’s tar-sands fields — perhaps as much as 3 trillion barrels. But we do know that it would take far less than that to put our planet on a path to runaway climate disruption.

I’ve said before that we cannot let that happen. Today, I’m proud to say that we aren’t letting that happen. Over its lifetime, the Statoil project alone would have released a total of  777.4 million metric tons (MMT) of CO2 into our atmosphere. For comparison, the EPA projects that its Clean Power Plan will be eliminating up to 555 MMT of CO2 emissions annually by 2030. Every single tar-sands project cancellation is a huge victory for the hundreds of thousands of people who’ve stood up to fight Keystone XL.

But as I said, it’s not about the pipe. It’s about stopping the expansion of tar-sands mining while we still can. The three dominos that have fallen this year in Alberta are just a beginning.

Let’s keep ‘em falling: Tell President Obama he needs to reject this pipeline for good.

Memories and Images of the Peoples Climate March

Thanks to long time Sierra Club member Nancy Bryant for this great message!

Memories of the “Great March”

Nancy C. Bryant

On Saturday, 8pm, September 20, our charter bus, along with nine other buses from NC, took off for New York City for the People’s Climate March the next day. The 55 people on our bus were to join what we had hoped would be 250,000 others, but which would become 400,000 at the final tally.

Now, why would 400,000 people come from all over the US and Norway and Canada, and who knows how many other counties, to march for one day? People of all ages, all colors, cultures and backgrounds. People singing, playing instruments, chanting, shouting, carrying signs and posters and waving flags and flying birds and giant parachutes, people walking, in strollers, in wheelchairs, on floats, on bikes, on scooters, on roller skates, dancing, prancing……..

I’ll tell you why. Because they care about what is happening to this, our fragile planet earth. They care about the future of their children and grandchildren and all living things on this earth. They care about the climate that is now changing so rapidly that we see it in front of our eyes, if we look about and pay attention to the climate. Just ask the farmers who were there. Just ask our local farmers. They want fossil fuels to continue being replaced with renewal energy sources, not 10 years from now, not 50 years from now, but now. They want the fracking to stop. They want our climate to get back into balance instead of heating up.

At first, my stepson, Jeep Bryant, and I marched with the contingent of people of faith and scientists, but later we joined the indigenous peoples of the world. There were people from labor, families, students, elders, environmental justice, community groups, neighborhood groups, the City Council of NYC, the head of the UN, movie and pop culture advocates – every possible group of people concerned about the issues.

The people who marched were marching with hope and exhilaration, knowing that millions more of us would also march for our fragile earth and the future for generations to come if they could. Deb from Anson, James from Montgomery and Harry from Richmond, my busmates, join me in saying that it was a highlight of our lives to be marching on Sunday, sharing the hope of a better world.

And now for some scenes from the People’s Climate Change March.

Enjoy the memories. Rekindle the passion. Take some action on the Climate Cris today and everyday…

PCM ImagesPCM Art and Photos

And for a special treat, listen to the “Voices of the the Peoples Climate March” by Brian Kasher

The audio stream includes over forty (40) mini-interviews; street music from: the Second Line Social Aid and Pleasure Society Brass Band, Rocket McFlyy, the Raging Grannies and more; chants, Central Park crickets, police helicopters, and general crowd ambiance. Two-hundred fifty three (253) sounds clips were recorded during the March.

PCM Voices 1

VOICES OF THE PEOPLE’S CLIMATE MARCH Volume 1

PCM Voices 1

Thanks to Sierra Club Central Piedmont Group member Brian Kasher for his passion to share a very powerful day in New York City – The People’s Climate March – and to issue a call to action. Great work Brian!

The Voices project documents the People’s Climate March exclusively from the aural perspective of one of the 400,000 plus marchers for change. Please share with your friends, your networks, and add your voice by continuing the conversation.

This audio stream includes over forty (40) mini-interviews; street music from: the Second Line Social Aid and Pleasure Society Brass Band, Rocket McFlyy, the Raging Grannies and more; chants from the street, Central Park crickets, police helicopters, and general crowd ambiance. Two-hundred fifty three (253) sounds clips were recorded during the March. The intro and epilogue were recorded by Greenpeace USA and Sierra Club organizers after the March though the music and crickets are from the March.

Click, Listen and Pass it on! This soundtrack is produced to be part of your networking and organizing toolkit. We need more people to get involved, plug in and be actively engaged in the change process right now! Join a group, write a letter, March and add your voice to the conversation advocating change for the better!

Brian Kasher

10 Buses, Hundreds of North and South Carolinians Attend Historic People’s Climate March

Thanks to Becky Bereiter and the TWC news team for seeing us off to New York City and the People’s Climate March as we joined 400,000 folks calling for Climate Action and Climate Justice!! Check back on our website for more national AND rider coverage!

PCM TWC News14 Coverage

Hundreds of North Carolinians Headed to NYC for People’s Climate March

CHARLOTTE — Hundreds of North Carolinians left for New York City Saturday night to take part in what is being called the largest march in history addressing climate change.

More than 100,000 people from around the country are expected at Sunday’s People’s Climate March.

The event comes ahead of next week’s United Nations Climate Summit. World leaders will gather to focus on efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and strengthen climate resilience.

“I think people are starting to see the severe storms, the flooding, the excess heat, and it’s starting to impact people’s pocketbooks,” said Bill Gupton of the North Carolina Sierra Club. “We have the have the same kind of movement we had with the civil rights movement and the labor movement.”

President Barack Obama is scheduled to speak at the summit. He is expected to urge his fellow heads of state to be as ambitious as possible as they negotiate a complicated, global treaty to reduce emissions. The treaty is set to be finalized in 2015.

Demonstrators hope Sunday’s March will help apply public pressure.

“They’re going to see it in the streets and they’re going to realize that this is not just an academic issue,” said Alan Harwick of Greensboro. “This is something that’s affecting real people now, and I think the march will show that.”

Other demonstrations are planned around the world in Delhi, Jakarta, and Rio de Janeiro. The UN Climate Summit is Tuesday.

http://centralnc.twcnews.com/content/news/all_nc_news/712078/hundreds-of-north-carolinians-headed-to-nyc-for-people-s-climate-march/#sthash.VZpY7yO7.dpuf