NC Climate Justice Summit, Nov 21-23

NC Cliamte Justice Summit

NC Climate Justice Summit

November 21 – 23, 2014
Beginning at 4:00 PM on Friday
Haw River State Park
On Hwy 64 where Haw River crosses over highway
Pittsboro, NC

Want to take the People’s Climate March passion to the next level? Sign up today to be a part of the change!

Register here:

What is the NC Climate Justice Summit?

The NC Climate Justice Summit (NCCJS) is the first statewide gathering of youth and adult community leaders focused on connecting the dots between social justice issues and climate change.

But NCCJS is not a conference.  It is an opportunity to bring our heads, hands and hearts to the biggest challenge of our times. It is a gathering that harnesses the strength of our diversity. We are all thought leaders with a crucial contribution to make toward answering these questions: How do we manifest climate justice in North Carolina?  How can we make all of our communities more resilient?

We will explore how climate change impacts our food, water, energy, housing, transportation, health and economy in NC. Together, we will name the problems and identify emerging solutions.  Together, we will build new community connections and skills that will support us to do the work of building the world we want to live in.

It is time to Re-imagine. Resist. Reform. Re-Create.  It is time for the NC Climate Justice Summit!

Register here:

The Summit’s at the Summit:

The NCCJS will take place at the Haw River State Park in Browns Summit, NC. The Haw River State Park is a beautiful environmental education conference center about 20 minutes north of Greensboro. The Park will provide all of our meals, lodging and meeting facilities during the NCCJS.  Lodging includes hotel-style accommodations for adults and cabins for youth; there is no camping.

NCCJS Agenda Highlights:

· Racial Equity Basecamp (8am-5pm, 11/21): addressing the legacy of racism within the environmental movement

· Re-imagining: generate our collective vision of climate justice in NC

· Intergenerational breakout groups: identify core problems, emerging solutions and possible actions

· Campaign Fair: organizations share their work and recruit new volunteers

· Outer Resilience Workshops: develop concrete skills in the 7 Summit issue areas (such as an energy workshop on low budget weatherizing or a food workshop on drought resistant gardening)

· Inner Resilience Workshops: hone cultural skills that support us to collaborate over the long haul (such as mindfulness practices, working in diverse groups and creative self-care)

· Open Space Session: participants lead their own workshops or discussions

· Cultural extravaganza: poetry slam, film showings and dance party!

· Regional breakout groups: learn about how to create Resilience Hubs to build on the learning from the Summit when we return home

Event Organizers

The NCCJS Leadership Team is a grassroots group of 13 teenage youth leaders and 8 adults from across NC.

For more information see:

“The alarm bells keep ringing, our citizens keep marching. We must answer the call”

Send feedback


If you haven”t read this yet it’s worth a read. If you like what you read, send the link to your friends and neighbors, post on Facebook. It’s time for action!

Obama to UN: “The Alarm Bells Keep Ringing, Our Citizens Keep Marching”
Transcript of U.S. President Barack Obama’s remarks at the UN Climate Summit in New York today:

For all the immediate challenges that we gather to address this week — terrorism, instability, inequality, disease — there’s one issue that will define the contours of this century more dramatically than any other, and that is the urgent and growing threat of a changing climate.

Five years have passed since many of us met in Copenhagen. And since then, our understanding of climate change has advanced — both in the deepening science that says this once-distant threat has moved “firmly into the present,” and into the sting of more frequent extreme weather events that show us exactly what these changes may mean for future generations.

No nation is immune. In America, the past decade has been our hottest on record. Along our eastern coast, the city of Miami now floods at high tide. In our west, wildfire season now stretches most of the year. In our heartland, farms have been parched by the worst drought in generations, and drenched by the wettest spring in our history. A hurricane left parts of this great city dark and underwater. And some nations already live with far worse. Worldwide, this summer was the hottest ever recorded — with global carbon emissions still on the rise.

So the climate is changing faster than our efforts to address it. The alarm bells keep ringing. Our citizens keep marching. We cannot pretend we do not hear them. We have to answer the call. We know what we have to do to avoid irreparable harm. We have to cut carbon pollution in our own countries to prevent the worst effects of climate change. We have to adapt to the impacts that, unfortunately, we can no longer avoid. And we have to work together as a global community to tackle this global threat before it is too late.

We cannot condemn our children, and their children, to a future that is beyond their capacity to repair. Not when we have the means — the technological innovation and the scientific imagination — to begin the work of repairing it right now.

As one of America’s governors has said, “We are the first generation to feel the impact of climate change and the last generation that can do something about it.” So today, I’m here personally, as the leader of the world’s largest economy and its second largest emitter, to say that we have begun to do something about it.

The United States has made ambitious investments in clean energy, and ambitious reductions in our carbon emissions. We now harness three times as much electricity from the wind and 10 times as much from the sun as we did when I came into office. Within a decade, our cars will go twice as far on a gallon of gas, and already, every major automaker offers electric vehicles. We’ve made unprecedented investments to cut energy waste in our homes and our buildings and our appliances, all of which will save consumers billions of dollars. And we are committed to helping communities build climate-resilient infrastructure.

So, all told, these advances have helped create jobs, grow our economy, and drive our carbon pollution to its lowest levels in nearly two decades — proving that there does not have to be a conflict between a sound environment and strong economic growth.

Over the past eight years, the United States has reduced our total carbon pollution by more than any other nation on Earth. But we have to do more. Last year, I issued America’s first Climate Action Plan to double down on our efforts. Under that plan, my administration is working with states and utilities to set first-ever standards to cut the amount of carbon pollution our power plants can dump into the air. And when completed, this will mark the single most important and significant step the United States has ever taken to reduce our carbon emissions.

Last week alone, we announced an array of new actions in renewable energy and energy efficiency that will save consumers more than $10 billion on their energy bills and cut carbon pollution by nearly 300 million metric tons through 2030. That’s the equivalent of taking more than 60 million cars off the road for one year.

I also convened a group of private sector leaders who’ve agreed to do their part to slash consumption of dangerous greenhouse gases known as HFCs — slash them 80 percent by 2050. And already, more than 100 nations have agreed to launch talks to phase down HFCs under the Montreal Protocol — the same agreement the world used successfully to phase out ozone-depleting chemicals. This is something that President Xi of China and I have worked on together. Just a few minutes ago, I met with Chinese Vice Premier Zhang Gaoli, and reiterated my belief that as the two largest economies and emitters in the world, we have a special responsibility to lead. That’s what big nations have to do. (Applause.)

And today, I call on all countries to join us -– not next year, or the year after, but right now, because no nation can meet this global threat alone. The United States has also engaged more allies and partners to cut carbon pollution and prepare for the impacts we cannot avoid. All told, American climate assistance now reaches more than 120 nations around the world. We’re helping more nations skip past the dirty phase of development, using current technologies, not duplicating the same mistakes and environmental degradation that took place previously.

We’re partnering with African entrepreneurs to launch clean energy projects. We’re helping farmers practice climate-smart agriculture and plant more durable crops. We’re building international coalitions to drive action, from reducing methane emissions from pipelines to launching a free trade agreement for environmental goods. And we have been working shoulder-to-shoulder with many of you to make the Green Climate Fund a reality.
But let me be honest. None of this is without controversy. In each of our countries, there are interests that will be resistant to action. And in each country, there is a suspicion that if we act and other countries don’t that we will be at an economic disadvantage. But we have to lead. That is what the United Nations and this General Assembly is about.

Now, the truth is, is that no matter what we do, some populations will still be at risk. The nations that contribute the least to climate change often stand to lose the most. And that’s why, since I took office, the United States has expanded our direct adaptation assistance eightfold, and we’re going to do more.

Today, I’m directing our federal agencies to begin factoring climate resilience into our international development programs and investments. And I’m announcing a new effort to deploy the unique scientific and technological capabilities of the United States, from climate data to early-warning systems. So this effort includes a new partnership that will draw on the resources and expertise of our leading private sector companies and philanthropies to help vulnerable nations better prepare for weather-related disasters, and better plan for long-term threats like steadily rising seas.

Yes, this is hard. But there should be no question that the United States of America is stepping up to the plate. We recognize our role in creating this problem; we embrace our responsibility to combat it. We will do our part, and we will help developing nations do theirs. But we can only succeed in combating climate change if we are joined in this effort by every nation –- developed and developing alike. Nobody gets a pass.

The emerging economies that have experienced some of the most dynamic growth in recent years have also emitted rising levels of carbon pollution. It is those emerging economies that are likely to produce more and more carbon emissions in the years to come. So nobody can stand on the sidelines on this issues. We have to set aside the old divides. We have to raise our collective ambition, each of us doing what we can to confront this global challenge.
This time, we need an agreement that reflects economic realities in the next decade and beyond. It must be ambitious –- because that’s what the scale of this challenge demands. It must be inclusive –- because every country must play its part. And, yes, it must be flexible –- because different nations have different circumstances.

Five years ago, I pledged America would reduce our carbon emissions in the range of 17 percent below 2005 levels by the year 2020. America will meet that target. And by early next year, we will put forward our next emission target, reflecting our confidence in the ability of our technological entrepreneurs and scientific innovators to lead the way.

So today, I call on all major economies to do the same. For I believe, in the words of Dr. King, that there is such a thing as being too late. And for the sake of future generations, our generation must move toward a global compact to confront a changing climate while we still can.

This challenge demands our ambition. Our children deserve such ambition. And if we act now, if we can look beyond the swarm of current events and some of the economic challenges and political challenges involved, if we place the air that our children will breathe and the food that they will eat and the hopes and dreams of all posterity above our own short-term interests, we may not be too late for them.

While you and I may not live to see all the fruits of our labor, we can act to see that the century ahead is marked not by conflict, but by cooperation; not by human suffering, but by human progress; and that the world we leave to our children, and our children’s children, will be cleaner and healthier, and more prosperous and secure.


Take Action: Continue the 50-Year Legacy of the Wilderness Act / Say “No” to Bills That Benefit Big Polluters

Celebrate this beautiful Friday and take some action on these issues!

Take Action: Continue the 50-Year Legacy of the Wilderness Act
Take Action: Continue the 50-Year Legacy of the Wilderness Act
In March, Congress passed a wilderness bill for the first time in five years. While we applaud this effort, several other pieces of legislation with strong bipartisan support are languishing in the House and the Senate. It is long past time to pass these public lands bills to protect the lands and waters that make America so special.

Take Action
Tell your members of Congress to pass these bills and protect wilderness today!


Take Action: Say “No” to Bills That Benefit Big Polluters
Take Action: Say
This week, House Republican leadership will again vote on a package of energy-related bills that benefit big polluters. Under the banner of “energy innovation” and “consumer protection,” these bills would actually gut commonsense environmental and public-health protections.

Take Action
Tell your member of Congress to oppose this package of attacks on the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act.

Oct 26 – Relive the Legacy of the Appalachian Trail

Join the Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC), the Sierra Club Central Piedmont Group,  and your fellow hikers during the ATC 2014 membership drive as we watch the film “The Appalachian Trail: An American Legacy”. Watch this never-before seen film, hear exciting guest speakers, win prizes, and much more! Best of all, you will be supporting the Trail you love; the Appalachian Trail.

Order your ticket todayUse the promo code “Sierra14” to receive 5% off!

Blumenthal Performing Arts – McGlohon Theatre
Sunday October 26, 2014
from 6:00pm-8:00pm

345 North College Street
Charlotte, NC

AT Legacy Oct 2014

Order your ticket todayUse the promo code “Sierra14” to receive 5% off!

Oct 16 More Moral Movies – Watch and Discuss “Disruption”

This is a powerful film that I highly recommend that you see! Join Action NC, Move to Amend, Greenpeace and the Sierra Club for a moving and inspiring evening!

Disruption Poster

Thursday, October 16


Unitarian Universalist Church of Charlotte
234 N Sharon Amity Rd
Charlotte, North Carolina 28211


‘When it comes to climate change, why do we do so little when we know so much?’

Through a relentless investigation to find the answer, Disruption takes an unflinching look at the devastating consequences of our inaction.

The exploration lays bare the terrifying science, the shattered political process, the unrelenting industry special interests and the civic stasis that have brought us to this social, moral and ecological crossroads.The film also takes us behind-the-scenes of the efforts to organize the largest climate rally in the history of the planet during the UN world climate summit.

This is the story of our unique moment in history. We are living through an age of tipping points and rapid social and planetary change. We’re the first generation to feel the impacts of climate disruption, and the last generation that can do something about it. The film enlarges the issue beyond climate impacts and makes a compelling call for bold action that is strong enough to tip the balance to build a clean energy future.

Oct 14 Webinar: Advocating with Compassion & NC General Assembly 101

Want to learn more about how to become a better advocate on environmental and social justice issues? Want to learn more about the North Carolina General Assembly and the legislative process? Then this webinar is for you! Register today for this NC IPL program.

North Carolina Interfaith Power and<br />

Advocating with Compassion & NC General Assembly 101

October 14, 2014, at 12:00 noon.


NCIPL is kicking off its exciting new Webinar program with a talk on Advocating with Compassion, and a simple, easy to understand ’101′ on the North Carolina General Assembly and governmental process. The webinar will be hosted by NCIPL’s Executive Director, Susannah Tuttle, and Veronica Shingleton, Communications and Advocacy Development Project Consultant.

This webinar will help you answer questions like:

  • How does the NCGA work?
  • Who holds the power?
  • What does it mean to advocate with compassion?
  • How can put my faith into action?

Susannah has been Executive Director of NCIPL for three years and will talk about her experience reaching out to congregations and officials with an open and engaging approach and the successes she’s experienced.

Veronica has extensive knowledge on these topics, with over 14 years of public policy and advocacy experience on the state and federal level.  In this webinar, she will help us better understand the legislative process and how that can guide advocacy efforts.

Mark your calendars! The webinar will take place at 12:00 p.m. on Tuesday, October 14.


Contact with any questions. We hope you can make it!